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Utah State University

Utah State University


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Established in 1888, Utah State University is a co-educational university based in Logan, Utah. It is one of the premier land-grant and space-grant universities in the county.With 41 academic departments, Utah State University awards a bachelor's degrees, post-bachelor's, master's degrees, doctoral degrees, associate's degrees, and other certified programs.These degrees and programs are offered through the university’s seven colleges such as the College of Agriculture, the College of Business, the College of Education and Human Services, the College of Engineering, the College of Humanities, Arts, and Social Sciences, the College of Natural Resources, and the College of Science.In addition to the academics, the university has a long tradition of research excellence, and has attained an international reputation in agriculture and engineering. It participates in nationally and internationally acclaimed programs of basic and applied research as a Carnegie Doctoral Research Extensive Institution.The university’s library system is inclusive of the Merrill-Cazier Library, the Library Peer Mentors, and the special collections and archives department. The libraries are committed to meet curricular and research needs of students and faculty members.The special collections and archives department, housed in the lower level of the Merrill-Cazier Library, holds books, manuscripts, photographs, maps, multi-media collections, microfilm, folklore items, and state documents.USU’s off-campus facilities include the University Inn, located a few blocks away from campus. The inn provides safe and comfortable lodging, and facilities for conferences and other activities.Utah State University is ranked among the top-25 Most Innovative Colleges in the nation and in the top-six of colleges of education by U.S. News & World Report for six years running.The campus was given the 2004 Award for Excellence in Economic Development by the United States Department of Commerce as one of the best places in the nation for rural economic development. The students and faculty have received national recognition from The New York Times, the Chicago Tribune, The Chronicle of Higher Education, and USA Today.


Utah State University

Founded in 1888, Utah State University is located in Logan, Utah which is eighty-one miles northeast of Salt Lake City. President Lincoln signed the Morrill-Land Grant Colleges Act that provided for the establishment of a university in each state and territory and Utah built the Utah Agricultural College. The college received university status in 1957 and was given its current name. The University now awards associate’s, bachelor’s, master’s, and doctoral degrees with many programs being offered online as well as in traditional classroom settings. USU prides itself on remaining true to its initial principle of dedicating itself to its land and its people. The university is accredited by the Northwest Commission on Colleges and Universities and is classified as a Doctoral/Research University-Extensive school by the Carnegie Corporation.


1918-1920: The War of the Nations

During World War 1, a great effort in terms of faculty and college facilities was put towards support of the war. Many of the faculty were away, and buildings were converted for war-time use. What is now the Quad was a parade ground, and the livestock building on its north side was used to house soldiers. After the war, it became a convalescent hospital and then in 1919 it was restored to house the departments related to animal industry.


What the heck is an Aggie? The history of mascots at Utah State University

Utah State University, founded in 1888, was a result of the 1862 Morrill Land-Grant College Act, which allowed land to be issued to states for the purpose of creating institutions of higher education.

Schools developed from the land grant acts were often full of farmers and other local people needed some way to distinguish themselves.

“Most of the land-grant schools were known as the Aggies. It was just the short way for saying agriculturalist,” said Bob Parsons, a university archivist. “As schools started getting bigger and more different, they looked for ways to differentiate themselves.”

Schools began to take on new names in conjunction with Aggie. The Wyoming Cowboys, the Oregon State Beavers and the University of Nevada, Reno Wolf Pack are just a few that followed.

Utah State didn’t start to make any of those transitions until later. “Utah State wasn’t really known as anything,” Parsons said.

The university has undergone a great deal of mascot change.

The following are two names that proceeded our Aggie title.

1940’s to the 1950s – The Farmers.

From the late 40s and early 50s, Utah State began to make a transition. Football announcers to introduce the school as the Aggies or the Farmers.

The first real mascot to grace the cover was an elderly farmer wearing bib overalls and chewing on a hay seed.

Regardless of the newly featured mascot, it still didn’t have a large role on campus.

“You didn’t have what we see today,” Parsons said. “There wasn’t some guy out there dressed up like a farmer. No one ran around in a suit.”

The farmers image lasted for almost a decade until the 60s when Big Blue came along.

1960s to early 1970s – The Highlanders?

Big Blue, a bull, was selected to represent the school as the mascot. During this time, the university experienced incredible growth and many looked towards the mascot as a way to represent that future.

“What I would hope for this university,” President Glen L. Taggart said in his inaugural address, “is that it would become widely known as a place where great teaching is emphasized and where a student, working within an intellectual environment, may come to know the marvelous victories that can come from the free mind alone,”

During the 1969-70 school year, a coalition was formed among the Student Senate and the Stater’s Council, called “The Forward USU Forum,” which existed to find a new and representative mascot for the school.

In an eight-page notification of their findings, they presented changing the mascot from the Farmers to the Utah State University Highlanders. Their reasons for picking such a mascot dwelt around the idea that “too many people still refer to the university as the Agricultural College.”

The efforts of the forum resulted in a resounding failure and backlash for the mascot change.

“They pushed too hard. If they would have presented one of those warriors from ‘Braveheart’ it might have been a go, but it looked so effeminate,” Parsons said. “There was a tremendous backlash against changing the mascot.”

Janet McKinnon, a graduate of Utah State, remembered what it was like when the changes were going on.

“I graduated in 1965. The school was really trying to make the change from the farm boys to something more sophisticated,” Janet said.

Through the efforts of the Forward USU Forum, Utah State became and remains know as the Aggies.


Majors that matter

We offer a world of majors so students can transform their passion into a career.

  • American Studies
  • Creative Writing
  • English Teaching
  • Literature
  • Professional & Technical Writing
  • History or History Teaching
  • Religious Studies
  • International Studies
  • Law & Constitutional Studies
  • Political Science
  • Anthropology
  • Social Work
  • Sociology
  • Sociology - Criminal Justice
  • Broadcast / Electronic Media
  • Print Journalism
  • Public Relations
  • Asian Studies
  • Chinese
  • Communication Studies
  • French or French Teaching
  • German or German Teaching
  • Global Communication
  • Liberal Arts
  • Philosophy
  • Philosophy - Ethics
  • Portuguese
  • Spanish or Spanish Teaching

Timeline

USU is founded as the Agricultural College of Utah (UAC) on March 8. Two years later, 14-year-old Miss Vendla Berntson enrolls as the Agricultural College of Utah's first student.

Agricultural College of Utah established its commercial department, making it the first business degree west of the Mississippi River.

The first eight students receive business degrees.

The business school becomes known as the School of Commerce and Business Administration.

Utah State Agricultural College becomes Utah State University. The School of Commerce and Business Administration becomes the College of Business and Social Sciences.

The George S. Eccles Business Building is dedicated on May 8.

The university initiates its Undergraduate Research Program, making it the second oldest program in the nation, behind MIT.

The College of Business becomes the Jon M. Huntsman School of Business after receiving a generous donation from the Huntsman Foundation.

A groundbreaking ceremony signals the beginning of construction for Huntsman Hall, a 125,000 square foot student-centered facility that will provide 21 new classrooms and 21 new meeting rooms. Huntsman Hall will adjoin the existing Eccles Business Building, creating one business complex.


Use of the Collection Return to Top

Restrictions on Use

It is the responsibility of the researcher to obtain any necessary copyright clearances.

Permission to publish material from the Utah State University history records> must be obtained from the University Archivist and/or the Special Collections Department Head.

Preferred Citation

Initial Citation: Utah State University History records USU_10.2. Special Collections and Archives. Utah State University Merrill-Cazier Library. Logan, Utah.

Following Citations:UUS_10.2, USUSCA.

Administrative Information Return to Top

Arrangement

This collection is arranged by date.

Acquisition Information

This collection was collected by Utah State University Archives.

Processing Note

Processed in November of 2019.

Detailed Description of the Collection Return to Top

University History Alphabetical Classification A thru Buildings, history, 1917-1994 Return to Top

Container(s): Box 1

University History Alphatical Classification C thru Faculty, 1922-1948 Return to Top

Container(s): Box 2

Forestry, Range and Wildlife Management, 1921-1957 Return to Top

Container(s): Box 3

Alphabetical Subject Classification, Founder's Day thru Histories, Undated Return to Top

Container(s): Box 4

University Band (Max Dalby), 1957 Return to Top

Container(s): Box 4a

Max Dalby original scores, Undated Return to Top

Container(s): Box 4b

University History - History of the College of Science by Eldon J. Gardner Twenty Chapters, 1986 Return to Top

Container(s): Box 5

History of College of Science Chapters 17-20 , 1930-1987 Return to Top

Container(s): Box 5a

Manuscript History of USU, Parson, 1890-1957 Return to Top

Container(s): Box 5b

University History Alphabetical Classification History thru Richmond, Mignon B., Undated Return to Top

Container(s): Box 6

University History Alphabetical Classification Scholastic thru 318th Training Program Return to Top

Container(s): Box 7

University History A History of Fifty Years, by Joal Edward Ricks, 1938 Return to Top

Container(s): Box 8

University History A History of 5 Years, 1888-1938 Return to Top

Container(s): Box 8a

University History Songs and Music, 1920-1972 Return to Top

Container(s): Box 9

University History Semi-centennial, 1938 Return to Top

Container(s): Box 10

Semi-centennial materials from the papers of President E.G. Peterson, 1888-1938 Return to Top

Container(s): Box 10a

Semi-centennial materials from the papers of President E.G. Peterson, 1938 Return to Top

Container(s): Box 10b

Semi-centennial, Newspapers collected, 1938 Return to Top

Container(s): Box 11

Founders' Day, 1926-l962 Return to Top

Container(s): Box 12

Founders' Day, 1963-1991 Return to Top

Container(s): Box 13

Founders' Day, 1992 Return to Top

Container(s): Box 14

Land-grant Centennial, 1962-1963 Return to Top

Container(s): Box 15

In celebration of the Morrill Act in l862 and the celebration of the 75 year history of the institution

Land-grant Centennial, 1962-1963 Return to Top

Container(s): Box 16

In celebration of the Morrill Act in l862 and the celebration of the 75 year History of the institution


The Utah Statesman

In 1978, after seventy-six years, Student Life received a new name, The Utah Statesman . Laurie (Turner) Snow was the editor of The Utah Statesman from 1978-1979. According to her, 1978 was also the first year that students had a full-time advisor for the paper. That advisor, Larry Baker, along with Snow made the decision to change names in order to provide “more professional news work,” an avenue for journalism students to practice journalism, and for the paper to be taken more seriously.

Alumni were not happy with the change arguing that the name “Student Life” was tradition. Other than that there was not a lot problem with the name change.

Originally, Snow was part of Student Life as a freshman. She was assigned to cover “Man on the Street” where she would ask various students a question. Their response as well as their photograph would be printed in the paper. About this assignment Snow said, “We had a lot of fun with that.”

Putting together a newspaper back then is much different than 2018. Snow said that they had, “old decrepit computers with keys that were stuck and didn’t work. There were also round black AP wire machines where we could go and rip off stories. That was the connection to the outside world. We would go to the library and look things up in books or magazines.”

Looking back and comparing journalism then and now Snow said, “In my opinion, there was much more of a journalistic commitment to objectivity and fairness. We were taught that in journalism school so much. Opinions were reserved for the editorial papers . . . The industry has changed dramatically.”

Adviser Larry Baker eventually left Utah State University for Southern Utah University. His replacement, Jay Wamsley, took over in the 1980s and retired after giving more than 30 years to The Utah Statesman in 2013.

Click through the interactive timeline to see more highlights of Student Life/The Utah Statesman history.

The Utah Statesman

In 1978, after seventy-six years, Student Life received a new name, The Utah Statesman . Laurie (Turner) Snow was the editor of The Utah Statesman from 1978-1979. According to her, 1978 was also the first year that students had a full-time advisor for the paper. That advisor, Larry Baker, along with Snow made the decision to change names in order to provide “more professional news work,” an avenue for journalism students to practice journalism, and for the paper to be taken more seriously.

Alumni were not happy with the change arguing that the name “Student Life” was tradition. Other than that there was not a lot problem with the name change.

Originally, Snow was part of Student Life as a freshman. She was assigned to cover “Man on the Street” where she would ask various students a question. Their response as well as their photograph would be printed in the paper. About this assignment Snow said, “We had a lot of fun with that.”

Putting together a newspaper back then is much different than 2018. Snow said that they had, “old decrepit computers with keys that were stuck and didn’t work. There were also round black AP wire machines where we could go and rip off stories. That was the connection to the outside world. We would go to the library and look things up in books or magazines.”

Looking back and comparing journalism then and now Snow said, “In my opinion, there was much more of a journalistic commitment to objectivity and fairness. We were taught that in journalism school so much. Opinions were reserved for the editorial papers . . . The industry has changed dramatically.”

Adviser Larry Baker eventually left Utah State University for Southern Utah University. His replacement, Jay Wamsley, took over in the 1980s and retired after giving more than 30 years to The Utah Statesman in 2013.

Click through the interactive timeline to see more highlights of Student Life/The Utah Statesman history.

SOUTHERN UTAH UNIVERSITY

In 1913 the school was changed to a branch of Utah State Agricultural College at Logan, Utah, and became known as Branch Agricultural College (BAC). In 1953 the name was changed to College of Southern Utah (CSU), and in 1971 it was changed again to Southern Utah State College (SUSC). In 1965 the state legislature approved a measure to transform the institution from a junior college to a four-year college consisting of four schools: Arts and Letters Business, Technology and Communication Education and Science. The four schools of the college are divided into thirteen departments plus a Division of Continuing Education. It was granted university status in 1992, becoming Southern Utah University.

SUU grants Associate of Applied Science degrees in vocational-technical and agricultural fields, including cooperative nursing education in conjunction with Weber State College. The institution also offers limited graduate degrees, including a Master of Professional Accountancy as well as a cooperative Master of Education program in conjunction with Utah State University. The student body, numbering more than 3,500, comes from all corners of the nation and more than a dozen foreign countries. More than 400 faculty and staff serve the undergraduate and graduate students.

The campus is located on 112 acres in the center of Cedar City. Its twenty-five buildings range from ivy-covered Old Main (1898) and the Braithwaite Liberal Arts Center (1899) to the Centrum, a special events center and classroom building, completed in 1987. The men's and women's basketball teams compete as NCAA Division I independents. The college football team plays in the Western Football Conference at NCAA Division II level. The school also has women's softball, a gymnastics team, co-ed rifle squad, and men's and women's track and cross-country programs.

In addition to the central campus, the college owns and operates a 1,000-acre farm in western Cedar Valley and a 3,700-acre ranch in Cedar Canyon. The campus is located in close proximity to Zion National Park, Cedar Breaks National Monument, and the Brian Head ski resort. The internationally acclaimed Utah Shakespearean Festival is presented each summer and the Braithwaite Fine Arts Gallery, the American Folk Ballet, Southern Utah University Press, Ashcroft Observatory, and a museum of natural history are important components of SUU. The completion in the summer of 1989 of the spectacular Randall Jones Memorial Theatre added another important cultural attraction to the college.

SUU prides itself on its broad-based effort to provide high quality instruction and to culturally enrich students and the community. A low faculty-student ratio (1:22) aids in the university's endeavor to distinguish itself as an institution devoted to excellence.

A ten-member institutional council implements policies assigned by the Utah State Board of Regents, including the appointment of personnel and the enactment of rules and governing regulations. The college is administered by a president, a president's council, the dean's council, the faculty senate, and the faculty.

Disclaimer: Information on this site was converted from a hard cover book published by University of Utah Press in 1994.


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