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Why was Pah-Ute County transferred to Nevada?

Why was Pah-Ute County transferred to Nevada?


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In 1866, the US Congress transferred the majority of Pah-Ute county from the Arizona Territory to the state of Nevada. This was done against the wishes of the territorial legislature of Arizona.

Why was the county transferred?


There seem to be two major lines of reasoning here, both conjecture, because apparently Congress never explained itself. Arizona's state historian Thomas Edwin Farish wrote:

For some reason, to this day unexplained, the greater portion of the land in this Arizona county [Pah Ute County] was ceded to the State of Nevada.

The first line of reasoning is that Congress wanted to create states with unified interests. As Beulah Hershheiser put in is his official state history of Nevada:

… the desired tract was a mining district; that Nevada was a mining state; and that the interests of the two were therefore identical.

Secondly, Congress may have felt comfortable rewarding Nevada with valuable resources at the expense of Arizona, as Arizona had recently sided with the Confederacy, and in fact had been granted territorial status by the Confederate government.


Source: Mark Stein, How the States Got Their Shapes Too


DMV Online Vehicle Registration

If you have purchased a vehicle from a Nevada dealer, you may be able to complete the registration online without a trip to the DMV! You can transfer your current license plates or get new standard plates through the mail. Be sure to get insurance before you begin.

License plates and the registration and sticker are mailed separately.

Sorry, but you must visit a DMV office to register your new vehicle if:

  • you did not purchase it from a Nevada dealer
  • it is a motor home, moped or trailer
  • you wish to order new personalized or specialty license plates
  • you wish to use a farmer/rancher exemption
  • any other limitations listed below apply

Registration Fees and Taxes Top ↑

Nevada charges a Registration Fee, a Governmental Services Tax and, in some counties, a Supplemental Governmental Services Tax.

  • The basic Registration Fee funds state road construction and the DMV operating budget.
  • The Governmental Services Tax funds local governments, school districts and the state General Fund.
  • The Supplemental Governmental Services Tax is a voter-approved tax used for highway construction in the counties which charge it, currently Clark and Churchill.
  • There are other factors which determine the final cost of registering a vehicle. Fees for a first-time Nevada title are $28.25. A set of standard license plates costs $8. The DMV collects sales taxes on many out-of-state dealer sales. There is a $6 Safety Fee on motorcycle registrations that funds safety programs and training.

Registration Fee Details

Registration fees are charged based on the class of the vehicle and its weight.
(NRS 482.480 and 482.482)

  • For every passenger car, reconstructed, or specially constructed passenger car, regardless of weight or number of passenger capacity, a fee for registration of $33.
  • For every motorcycle, a fee for registration of $33 and for each motorcycle other than a trimobile, an additional fee of $6 for motorcycle safety.
  • For every moped, a fee for registration of $33.
  • For every travel trailer, a fee for registration of $27.
  • For every trailer or semitrailer having an unladen weight of 1,000 pounds or less, a flat registration fee of $12.
  • For every trailer having an unladen weight of more than 1,000 pounds, a flat registration fee of $24.
  • For every permit for the operation of a golf cart, an annual fee of $10.
  • For every low-speed vehicle, as that term is defined in NRS 484.527, a fee for registration of $33.
  • For every motor truck, truck-tractor or bus, which has a declared gross weight of:
    • Less than 6,000 pounds, a fee of $33.
    • Not less than 6,000 pounds and not more than 8,499 pounds, a fee of $38.
    • Not less than 8,500 pounds and not more than 10,000 pounds, a fee of $48.
    • Not less than 10,001 pounds and not more than 26,000 pounds, a fee of $12 for each 1,000 pounds or fraction thereof.
    • Not less than 26,001 pounds and not more than 80,000 pounds, a fee of $17 for each 1,000 pounds or fraction thereof. The maximum fee is $1,360.

    Sample Governmental Services Tax Calculation

    Taxes are based on the original Manufacturers Suggested Retail Price (MSRP) set when the vehicle was new.
    (NRS Chapter 371)

    • The MSRP will not change over time regardless of vehicle age or condition. The first calculation is the DMV Valuation of the vehicle, which is 35% of MSRP.
    • The DMV Valuation is then depreciated 5% after the first year and 10% per year thereafter until it reaches a minimum of 15%. The minimum Governmental Services Tax is $16.00.
    • The Governmental Services Tax is 4 cents on each $1 of the depreciated DMV Valuation.
    • The Supplemental Governmental Services Tax is 1 cent on each $1 of the depreciated DMV Valuation.

    The Supplemental Governmental Services Tax, if charged in the above example, would be $60 (after rounding) for total taxes of $298.

    Commercial vehicles with a declared gross weight of 10,000 pounds or more and trailers with an unladen weight of 4,000 pounds or more use a different schedule.


    Why was Pah-Ute County transferred to Nevada? - History

    CHAPTER XLVI.
    HISTORY OF HUMBOLDT COUNTY.

    In the northern and eastern portion of the county are many fine valleys, which for beauty and fertility have no superiors and few equals. The bunch-grass is probably the most nutritious of all the grasses, and keeps its virtues even when covered several feet with snow. Cattle will thrive, and even get fat on this when they have to paw the snow away to get at it, though the snows do not often remain on the ground many weeks at a time. The Humboldt Valley east of the Great Bend is nearly worthless for agriculture, but after the river passes through the West Humboldt range of mountains and turns toward the south, the valley becomes wider, grassy meadows take the place of the sage-brush flats, and finally the great meadows are reached. Those who crossed the plains with teams before the time of the railway, will remember that unbroken, even untrodden miles of the finest grass, waist-high, covered these natural lawns, 50,000 or more animals halting there had only cropped away the outer edge, so extensive was the range. These meadows will be referred to again in the sketches of the several towns and settlements.

    APPOINTMENTS AND ELECTIONS.
    The names of those who filled the various positions of honor and trust in the county, either by appointment or election, and the date of such ’appointment or election in each case, are given below:-

    ASSEMBLYMEN.
    Wm. H. Claggett, A. J. Simmons, elected Representatives under Territorial law September 3, 1862, re-elected September 2, 1863 L. D. Prescott, J. W. Strong and A. J. Simmons, elected Assemblymen January 19, 1864 D. H. Brown and E. W. Pratt, elected Representatives September 7, 1864 D. H. Brown, B. H. Nichols and J. Angus Dean, elected Assemblymen, November 8, 1864, under the Constitution that was rejected J. A. Banks, T. V . Julien and J. J. Linn, elected November 7, 1865 P, J. Parmater, T. V. Julien and O. K. Stampley, elected November 6, 1866 J. M. Woodworth, R, H. Scott and T. W, Rule, elected November 3, 1868 W. A. Trousdale, Thomas Harris and Joseph Organ, elected November 8, 1870 John O. Teviss, Charles H. Stoddard and John H. Hoppin, elected November 5, 1872 L, A. Buckner, Pablo Laveago and J. B. Case, elected November 3, 1874 S. W. Hammond, W. H. Howard and W. A. Trousdale elected November 7, 1876 Angus Morrison, David McLarkey and O. P. Crawford, elected November 5, 1878 A, J. Shepard, Joseph Organ and Thomas J. Bradshaw, elected November 2, 1880.

    COUNTY COMMISSIONERS.
    M. S. Thompson, J. G. Briggs and A. Benway were appointed in 1861 J. G. Briggs, L. M. Carter and M. S. Thompson, elected January 14, 1862 R. M. Johnson, A. P. K. Safford and L. M. Carter, elected September 3, 1862. Johnson did not qualify, and J. B. Addlebaugh appointed November 15, 1862. Safford resigned October 20, 1862, and Thomas Ewing appointed to fill vacancy. Thos. A. Freeman, W. W. Williams and C. W. Shang, elected September 2, 1863 A. D. McCullough and T. A. Freeman, elected September 7, 1864 Geo. W. Fox, elected November 8, 1865 A. D. McCullough, Robert B. Fluger and L. L, Rigby, elected November 6, 1866 H. G. Cavin and Thomas Thompson, elected November 3, 1868 B. F. Riley, Frank Drake and G. M. Miller, elected November 8, 1870 John Borland and Nathan Levy, elected November 5, 1872. C. A. Nichols and J. F. Clark, elected November 3, 1874 R. W. Wood and A. Westfall, elected November 7, 1876 R. H. Scott and H. P. Marker, elected November 5, 1878 D. Giroux and L. N. Carpenter, elected November 2, 1880.

    PROBATE JUDGES.
    A. W. Olliver, appointed December 10, 1861 Hiram Knowles, elected September 2, 1863, re-elected January 19, 1864.

    DISTRICT ATTORNEYS.
    Wm. W. Dixon, appointed Prosecuting Attorney December 22, 1862, resigned January 9, 1863, and Hiram Knowles, appointed January 15, 1863, to fill vacancy O. R. Leonard, elected September 2, 1863 A. P. Overton, elected District Attorney November 8, 1864, There being no vacancy he never served. O. R. Leonard held over until January, 1867, by virtue of Section 13 of Article 17 of the Constitution. O. R. Leonard elected November 6, 1866 P. H. Harris, elected November 3, 1868, re-elected November 8, 1870 T. V. Julien, elected November 5, 1872 S. S. Grass, elected November 3, 1874 Geo. P. Harding, elected November 7, 1876, re-elected November 5, 1878 J. H. McMillan, elected November 2, 1880.

    COUNTY SHERIFFS.
    A. W. Nightingill, appointed December 10, 1861 Robert McBeth, elected January 14, 1862 re-elected September 3, 1862 S. D. Prescott, elected September 7, 1864 J. M. Woodworth, elected November 6, 1866 J. N. Thacker, elected November 3, 1868 N, H. Westfall, elected November 8, 1870 Samuel King, elected November 5, 1872 Richard Nash, elected November 3, 1874 Charles A. Kyle, elected November 7, 1876 Geo. M, Miller, elected November 5, 1878 W. T. Burns, elected November 2, 1880.

    COUNTY CLERKS.
    J. W. Whitney, elected January 14, 1862 re-elected September 3, 1862. Wm. K. Parkinson, appointed March 1, 1864, in place of Whitney, deceased. Wm. K. Parkinson, elected September 7, 1864 J. D. Minor, elected November 6, 1866 re-elected November 3, 1868 C. S. Varian, elected November 8, 1870 J. H. Job, elected November 5, 1872, re-elected November 3, 1874, re-elected November 7, 1876, reelected November 5, 1878 J. E. Sabine, elected November 2, 1880.

    COUNTY TREASURERS.
    A. W. Nightingill, elected January 14, 1862 W. A. Holcomb, elected September 3, 1862, re-elected September 7, 1864 M. P. Freeman, elected November 6, 1866 J. M. Brown, elected November 3, 1868 Christopher Lark, elected November 7, 1870, re-elected November 5, 1872 A. J. Shepard, elected November 3, 1874, re-elected November 7, 1876, re-elected November 5, 1878 C. A. La Grave, elected November 2, 1880.

    COUNTY ASSESSORS,
    S. M. Boblett, elected January 14, 1862 E. E. Comstock, elected September 3, 1862. Hiram Welch was appointed June 6, 1864, in place of Comstock, absent. W. J. Hanks, elected September 7, 1864 M. H. Haviland, elected November 6, 1866 J. Q. Dryden, elected November 3, 1868 Charles Kyle elected November 8, 1870, re-elected November 5 1872 James Buckner, elected November 3, 1874 re-elected November 7, 1876 L. L. Rickard, elected November 5, 1878 William Perkins, elected November 2, 1880.

    COUNTY RECORDERS.
    Wm. Brayton, elected January 14, 1862, re-elected September 3, 1862. J. D. Minor, appointed April 6 1863, in place of Brayton, deceased. A. P. K. Safford, elected September 2, 1863, re-elected September 7, 1864 H. Welch, elected November 6, 1866, re-elected November 3, 1868 S. J. Bonnifield elected November 8, 1870, re-elected November 5. 1872 Charles A. La Grave, elected November 3 1874, re-elected November 7, 1876 G. F. Turriten, elected November 5, 1878 W. A, Trousdale, elected November 2, 1880.

    COUNTY SUPERINTENDENTS OF SCHOOLS.
    E. A. Scott, elected September 3, 1862, Office declared vacant April 6, 1863, and H. Pfersdorff appointed to fill vacancy. J. F. Kingsbury, elected September 7, 1864 A. H. Heaslep, elected November 7, 1865 George M. Miller was appointed April 2, 1866 T. G. Negus, elected November 6, 1866, reelected November 3, 1868 L. M. Irving, elected November 8, 1870 C. Chenowith, elected November 5, 1872, re-elected November 3, 1874, re-elected November 7, 1876, re-elected November 5, 1878, reelected November 2, 1880.

    COUNTY SURVEYORS.
    Wm. Epler, appointed December 9, 1861 Wm. Epler, elected January 14, 1862, re-elected September 3, 1862, re-elected September 7, 1864 P. K. Root, elected November 6, 1866, re-elected November 3, 1868 T. Ginacca, elected November 8, 1870 Joseph Ginacca, elected November 5, 1872 D. Van Lennep, elected November 3, 1874, re-elected November 7, 1876, re-elected November 5, 1878 T, D, Parkinson, elected November 2, 1880.

    PUBLIC ADMINISTRATORS.
    W. F. Stevens, elected November 6, 1866, reelected November 3, 1868 James Buckner, elected November 8, 1870 David McLarkey, elected November 5, 1872 M. Oppenheim, elected November 3, 1874 Pat. Bell, elected November 7, 1876 M. Oppenheim, elected November 5, 1878, re-elected November 2, 1880.

    COLLECTORS.
    Frank K. Wheeler, elected September 3, 1862, re-elected September 7, 1864, resigned April 2, 1866 J. D. Minor appointed to fill vacancy.

    BLACK ROCK DISTRICT has been the subject of more speculation, the cause of more brilliant expectations, and greater disappointments than perhaps any other section of country in the mining regions. As early as 1859 men began to hunt for precious metals among the curious black ledges which were so different from anything seen elsewhere. It was soft, easily whittled, and had some of the lustre, when cut, pertaining to all minerals and ores. Anything new had tremendous possibilities in it. If this was silver the only apprehension felt was that the enormous quantity in sight would utterly destroy the value of that metal. By some it was urged that precious metals were never deposited in such large quantities that it was impossible. Others saw no reason why mountains of silver should not be found as well as mountains of iron. Most of the assayers pronounced the rock worthless others said that it would yield, under proper treatment, $50 to $500 per ton. The Assessor and Surveyor of the county for 1867-68 reported as follows:-
    The difficulty met in reduction has already been adverted to. It arose from a total misunderstanding of the nature of the ore. The ores are true salts of silver and gold, which have gone through one of the most important steps in the process of reduction in the laboratory of nature, in the bosom of the earth, and are found in the form of chlorides, iodides, bromides, cyanides, and nitrates. To attempt to chloridize a chloride is folly, but that is what most of the workers of this rock have undertaken to do, and the reputation of the district has suffered in consequence. But give credit to nature for what she has done -- commence where she has left off and the reduction of the ore is a very simple matter. The public chose the side of tremendous possibilities, and pronounced the rock good. Several districts were organized, and a number of mines in each opened. A railway, with steam navigation across Pyramid Lake, was talked of, and great cities built in imagination, but the price of silver did not come down, nor did the discovery work any change in the monetary affairs of the world. The silver was not there. At present there is no work being done at Black Rock. Three mills, built respectively by the Black Rock, Goodwin, and Atchinson Companies, were removed, after giving the mines a fair trial. Other districts in the vicinity, called the Hardin, Piute, Foreman, Chico, and High Rock had about the same history. The famous Rabbit Hole sulphur mines are in this district. The first locations were made in March, 1875, by McWorthy and Rover. Shortly afterward locations were made by Hale & Wright, one mile and a half distant. The sulphur is found mixed with clay, and sometimes nearly pure in large masses, and seems to have been distilled, or sublimed, out of the adjoining rocks, which are black, slaty marl and limestone. An alkali flat bounds the sulphur deposit opposite the hills or mountains. Both places are owned by the Pacific Sulphur Company, which ships large amounts to San Francisco, where it is refined and used for making sulphuric acid and other chemicals. It is worth at San Francisco about seventy-five dollars per ton. The deposit is about twenty-five miles due north of the Humboldt House, a station on the Central Pacific Railroad.

    BUENA VISTA DISTRICT was organized in 1861. Is in one of the most beautiful sections of the State, with cold springs, which feed a perennial mill-stream flowing through a broad and fertile valley. The mines in this district have furnished nearly $4,000,000 in bullion, and some of them, such as the Arizona and Hope, are still on a paying basis. Among the prominent mines in early days were the National, Governor Downey, Alba Nueva, Cass, Joe Pickering, Halleck, Seminole, Eagle, Leroy, Agamemnon, Manitowoc, Champion, Cedar Hill, North Star, Atlas, etc. These had veins of ore three feet or more in width, reported as paying from $50 to $1,200 per ton. Some of the veins would run as high as $400 per ton but the general average was very much less than was estimated when the mines were being opened, and the final result was not as satisfactory as the estimates and assays indicated. In 1878, of all the mines in the county, only the Arizona and Rye Patch paid a bullion tax. From 1871 to 1878 the Arizona produced $1,302,238.58. Water was encountered at the depth of eighty feet, and at the depth of 400 feet it became uncontrollable. The property was owned by John C. Fall & Co, The district lies on the eastern slope of the West Humboldt Mountains, about twenty-five miles south of the Central Pacific Railroad at Mill City.

    CENTRAL DISTRICT was organized in 1862, the principal mine being called the Fifty-Six. The vein, which was a compound or multiple vein, and sixty-five feet wide, was rich in copper and silver, containing of the latter some sixty or seventy dollars to the ton. It was soon after sold to a New York company, in anticipation of the building of the transcontinental railway. Ten years afterward locations were made under the names of Teamster, Golden Age, Railroad, Locomotive, Hammond and Monarch. The veins are said to be very narrow, with bodies of very rich ore, yielding in some instances $2,000 to the ton. Up to 1875 the Golden Age had produced about $17,000 in bullion, the ore averaging $400 per ton. The mill, a four-stamp, was burned in 1876, since which time little work has been done.

    ECHO DISTRICT was among the first organized, dating back to 1863, and is situated on the western slope of the West Humboldt range of mountains, the Buena Vista being opposite on the east. The noted mines at the time of the organization were the Washington, Mountain King, Mining Star and Alpha. The Washington Mine included several parallel veins, two to three feet wide, assaying as high as $500 per ton, with every appearance of being a true fissure vein. The Mountain King was to the south of the Washington, with similar croppings and characteristics. This was considered a very promising vein also. The vein was tapped at a depth of 500 feet with a tunnel 450 feet in length. The San Francisco was north of the Washington Mine. The Mining Star veins were at the head of the Echo Cañon, on the same range as the Washington and Mining Star. The Alpha Mine, located in 1864, is situated at the mouth of Panther Cañon. The ore is found in considerable quantities in chutes and pockets in a metamorphic limestone. The mine was sold in 1869 to an English company for $62,000, and has been worked most of the time since. Selected ore mills $100 per ton. The Rye Patch Mine is a similar formation and is owned and worked by the same company, as is also the Butte Mine. The company has paid several dividends and owns a Stetefeldt furnace and ten-stamp mill, at the Rye Patch Railway Station.
    The dividends aggregate ___ $127,500 The assessments “ ____________ 97,500 The Rye Patch Consolidated is an incorporated company with stock called on the Boards at San Francisco. The works have been tied up to some extent for some years, in consequence of a suit with the Reese River Gold and Silver Mining Company, who sued to obtain possession of the Alpha Mine and $225,000 damages.

    EL DORADO DISTRICT is situated on the western slope of the West Humboldt Range, west of Star Peak. The ledge which drew attention to this section was the Banner, and is now known as the El Dorado, and is 3,330 feet in length. The Corinth, New England and Mount Carmel were also noted mines. None of the mines have met the expectations of the owners or become noted.

    GOLD RUN DISTRICT was organized in 1866, and is located on the second range of mountains east of the lower Humboldt, the Golconda, Cumberland and Jefferson being the principal places of promise, though numerous other locations were made. The Golconda, in particular, was supposed to be an immense fortune. The following extract from the report of the Surveyor General will show the estimate of its value in 1868:--
    The Golconda is an immense mass of mineral, yielding from $40 to $118 per ton in the mill. * * * A shaft eighty feet deep has been sunk in a solid bed of ore. This shaft and a large cut on the surface, some forty feet in length and fifteen feet deep, expose thousands of tons of very fine ore, sufficient to employ several mills for several years. In working the assessments under the district laws the owners have found rich and well-defined veins of ore on three several places, of the same character as the original location. * * * * * Assays as high as $12,486 per ton have been made from this ore by Sidney Tuttle, assayer at the Oreana Smelting Works.
    But a small amount of bullion tax was ever paid from these mines.
    HUMBOLDT DISTRICT, organized in 1860, has the honor of being the first in the county, is on the westerly slope of the Star range of mountains, about five miles from the river, two and a half from the Central Pacific Railroad, sixteen miles from Unionville, and one hundred and seventy-five miles from Virginia City. Humboldt Creek, forming Humboldt Cañon which is four miles long, runs through the district. A strong vein or reef of limestone, in some places seventy feet high, crossing the cañon, is one of the main geological features of the district. Several quartz veins running parallel to the limestone reef first called the attention of the prospectors to the mineral wealth of the district. On the lower side of the reef are the Reveille, Franklin, Santa Cruz, and Monte Christo veins. On the upper side, in a quartzite formation, are the Starlight, Calaveras, Sigel, Adriatic, Winnemucca, Washington, and Saint Bernard, occurring in the order mentioned. According to the reports of 1868, the Starlight had a vein ten feet wide Calaveras, sixteen feet Sigel, two feet, bearing gold Adriatic, four feet Winnemucca, twenty-four feet Washington and Saint Bernard, four feet each.
    Nine mines were opened to a depth of fifty feet or more, and tunnels were driven into the mines at a great expense, but no large bodies of ore were found. During the panic of 1865 all work was suspended, though the claims were not wholly abandoned. In the winter of 1870-71 work was resumed on the Starlight and a mine called the Madia. At a depth of seventy feet the vein of the Starlight was four feet thick, standing nearly perpendicular. The Madia was in the foot-hills, and was a vast mass of quartz containing some gold, arsenic, and silver, the gold being four to nine dollars a ton through the mass. None of these mines ever became productive. With cheap timber, fuel, and labor, some of the mines may be put on a paying basis. During its best days the district contained about 500 inhabitants. Not far from the railway is a deposit of sulphur, left by an extinct thermal spring. The deposit of sulphur alternating with gypsum is about twenty-five feet across, and of uncertain depth. It has some economic value, but is more interesting as a relic of the geological formation of the country.

    MOUNT ROSE DISTRICT, located in 1871, is situated in the boundaries of the famous Paradise Valley, in the northeastern part of the county. Having been discovered and developed since the great mining craze of the decade of sixty, it may be relied upon as promising something for the future. It is said that wood, water and other supplies are in such abundance as to make it the most favorable point for mining in the State. The veins are well-defined with porphyry and granite walls. The ore is rich, carrying both gold and silver, and easily reduced. The principal work, so far, has been done by the Paradise Mining Company, though perhaps a hundred other locations are made. Their vein crops out on the face of a steep mountain, affording good opportunities to mine with tunnels or drifts. Largo quantities of ore have been extracted, which averages $200 per ton. So far as explored, the vein averages six feet in width. The ore is crushed at a ten-stamp mill, running by water and steam, as circumstances require. The mill has changed hands several times, so that the quantity of ore reduced is unknown. It is estimated at $300,000.

    ORO FINO DISTRICT was organized in 1863, in the same range as the Sierra District, lying to the south. The prominent features are a quartzite formation dipping west and capped with limestone. This gives an appearance to the ridge or reef as being composed of quartz on the east side and lime on the west. On the summit of the ridge is an immense vein, called the Great Eastern, of opaque, brilliant, white quartz, which crops out for a distance of seven or eight miles, from six to thirty feet wide, from which assays have been made from $80 to $500 per ton in silver, which is found as a black chloride. Two other veins, less prominent, but supposed to be richer, called the Natchez and Yo Semite, attracted the attention of the first prospectors of this district. The Natchez is on the eastern slope, and consequently underlying the Great Eastern and running parallel to it at a distance on the slope of about 2,000 feet. The ore was said, in 1868, at the time of the discovery, to assay as high as $16,000 per ton, and the whole mass as averaging $175 per ton by the pan process.

    The Yo Semite vein is in the northern part of the district, and was estimated to yield $500 per ton on an average. Oro Fino Creek, at the foot of the western slope, was thought to furnish ample mill-power for the mines. None of these fine prospects ever became profitable mines, and at present are not worked.

    PINE FOREST DISTRICT is in the extreme northern portion of the State, and was organized about the time of the Black Rock excitement. Nothing has ever been done in the district. The country is said to be well watered and timbered, and will probably prove more valuable for agriculture than for mining.

    SACRAMENTO DISTRICT is in the West Humboldt Range, south of Unionville and east of the Great Meadows, and within a short distance of the Central Pacific Railroad. The Montana, Bullion, Sacramento, and Nevada were the prominent attractions in the district at the time of the organization. The ledges cropped out boldly and were said to be well charged with sulphurets of silver. Like many others, most others, in fact, failure was the result.

    SIERRA DISTRICT was organized in January, 1863, and is one of the cluster in the vicinity of Unionville, which is about twenty-three miles to the southwest, The Central Pacific Railroad and the Humboldt Canal run through the district. The town of Dun Glen, in the center of the district, is about five miles from the river.

    The attractions to this district were the Neptune series of ledges, on which were Tallulah, Empire and Essex Mines, and the Gem, about five miles to the north of Dun Glen. These ledges were several feet in width, with firm, smooth walls and clay selvedge, and were supposed to be permanent, first-class mines. According to the Assessor of 1868, the ledges were well charged with various kinds of silver ores, the rock assaying as high as $6,000 per ton, the Gem Mine reaching as high as $16,000 per ton. Several long tunnels were run into the hills, one to the Essex vein being 635 feet long, tapping a vein of three feet another to the Ophir Ledge, of 320 feet, cutting a vein of four and a half feet, both of which were estimated to mill forty dollars per ton without selection. The Gem was in a limestone formation, and was said to yield an average of $175 per ton. The Chrysopolis was about two miles north of Dun Glen, and had a vein of white quartz twenty inches wide, charged with black sulphurets of silver, and was estimated to average $100 per ton. The company had 1,800 feet on the vein, which held its width and quality to the depth of eighty feet, the deepest working. The Munroe Ledges were to the south of Dun Glen about one mile. These were charged with free gold and also gold in sulphurets. The country rock is graywacke or metamorphic slate of the earlier series of sedimentary rocks. The average yield was said in 1868 to be $250 per ton. For the first two quarters the returns were $526.92 per ton and $279.05. Selected ore paid $1,000 or upwards per ton.

    STAR DISTRICT was organized in 1861, and is one of the cluster in the vicinity of Unionville, the town of Star City being about twelve miles from Unionville. The strata at this point dip west at angles varying from 25° to 80°. The district comprised a territory six miles long on the slope of the mountain and four miles wide. A gorge through this toward the east exposed the different strata and also served to drain the entire district, the stream running about seventy inches of water, miners’ measurement, in the summer and a larger stream during the rainy season. As the sources of this stream are high up among the snows it affords quite a quantity of water when the vicinity is parched with drought. In ascending the cañon or viewing the stratification from the east, the rocks appear in the following order, the first named being the lowest of the series and the last named the uppermost:-- Brown Quartzite, steel-gray when broken, greatly metamorphosed. Black Limestone , sprangled with veins of feldspar and sulphuret of iron has a cleavage parallel to the stratification. In this stratum is the Almira series of veins on the north of the creek and the Yankee series on the south. The Commonwealth Company of New York owned 2,400 feet on this range. The width of the veins is three to eight feet. The ores were supposed to be free from rebellious mixtures and to be easily milled. The ores on the south side, or on the Yankee claims, were similar to the Almira lode, though there were three distinct varieties, one being identical with the ore of the famous Sheba mine. Graywacke , of a bluish-gray and extremely hard, forming an extensive portion of the mountain. Hard, black laminated slate. Between the last two is the celebrated Sheba vein or ore channel, one hundred and fifty feet wide, the value estimated in 1868 as follows: First-class ore per ton, $1,200 second-class ore per ton, $250 third-class ore per ton, $150. Some of the assays reached as high as $16,000 per ton. The ore required roasting before reduction. It was worked up to within twelve per cent. of the fire assay at a cost of thirty-five dollars per ton. The extensions north and south, two or three thousand feet, did not differ materially from the original location. An immense amount of work was done on the mountain, but the ores were not as extensive, nor as rich or as easily reduced as was anticipated in 1868, and the mines were nearly abandoned for a long time. Recently considerable concentrated ore has been shipped to San Francisco for reduction. No bullion tax was paid in 1880. The Sheba and De Soto mines are still being worked.

    The black slate, forming the hanging wall of the Sheba mines, extended up the mountain for three-fourths of a mile, when it abruptly terminated, meeting a quartzite stratum more decidedly silicious than the veins at the foot of the slope. Several veins of hard, glassy quartz, four to eight feet thick, cropped out of this stratum for nearly a mile, receiving the name of the Mammoth Lodes. The ore was an argentiferous galena, assaying $180 to $900 per ton. The Mauch Chunk and Maston were the prominent locations on this lode. Above the mammoth series and in the same quartzite formation were the Mountain Top series, which is such a geological curiosity as to merit an extended notice. This lode seems to have been a fissure in all the rest of the formations, made after they were all in place, as it cuts all in a direction diagonal to all the lines of stratification, the fissure being filled with brilliant white quartz which is visible by its outcrop for ten miles, forming a prominent landmark. It is an evidence of the vigor of nature’s workings when the minerals were being distributed or perhaps concentrated into veins. From the south side of this great vein a dozen or more small veins of mineral shoot out and come to the surface. Little work was done on them, though it was proposed to run a tunnel into the mountain which should tap it at a depth of 2000 feet. They went so far as to organize and name the Perigord Tunneling Company, and stopped at that point.

    TRINITY DISTRICT was organized in 1863. It is situated twenty-five miles north of Humboldt Lake, and thirty miles southwest of Unionville, opposite and west of the towns of Etna, Torreyville, and Oreana, which are built along the Humboldt River. The mines which gave the place its reputation were the Montezuma, Jersey, Savannah, Sultana, Chloride, Guatimozin, Tontine, Eagle, Dunderburg, Ne Plus, Bald Hornet, Daisy and Oxide, Atlantic, Northern Belle, Southern Belle, Eastern Belle, and Western Belle, Hurricane, Vanderbilt, Belvidere, Savanna, Shamrock, Dundock, Daisy, Kingkalla, and General Grant, formerly the Moonlight. These were all located in a section of country called Arabia, and at one time were believed to be the richest mines in the known world, the Assessor of the county, in 1868, expressing the opinion that a mile square, within which they were located, would produce more bullion than any other ever known. The Montezuma, especially, was so rich that every ton of ore produced a half ton of metal, consisting of antimony, lead, and silver, there being no rock at all in the vein. Up to 1875 there had been taken out of the mine 7,000 tons of ore, yielding 3,150 tons of lead, and, according to the State Mineralogist, $455,000 in silver. The Evening Star, by the same authority, paid sixty-five dollars per ton in silver. The Chloride, a narrow vein, was said to assay as high as $1,200 per ton. The General Grant was a relocation of the Moonlight. About $100,000 was taken from this mine when it was first located and worked. The ore from the Montezuma mines were reduced at the Montezuma Smelting Works, located at Oreana, which at that time (1868) were said to be the most complete of any in the State. They were under the charge of A, W. Nason, and were estimated by George Lovelock to have cost $250,000. In 1868, the annual product was estimated at $45,000. In 1880, the best authorities place the whole of the ores extracted at 30,000 tons, which paid from thirty dollars up to $700 per ton. The veins followed the general trend of the mountains from north to south. The Evening Star mine was worked extensively in 1864, The ore is a black sulphuret, with some horn silver, remarkably free from base metals, and yielded sixty-five dollars per ton down to a depth of 200 feet, when water was reached, since which time little work has been done. Since the destruction of the Oreana Smelting Works by fire the ores of this district are reduced at Salt Lake City. All the paying mines are now bonded to Voshay & Lyons, formerly of the Emma Mine of Utah.

    VICKSBURG DISTRICT was organized about the time of the Black Rock excitement, and was situated some seventy miles north of Humboldt City. The miners were driven out of the country in 1864, during the Indian War. The principal mines were the Spring, Silver, Great Southern, Montana, and Excelsior. After the termination of the Indian difficulties work was resumed, but nothing valuable was developed.

    WINNEMUCCA DISTRICT is about forty miles north of Unionville, on the west side of the Humboldt River, near the great bend and three miles from the railroad. The principal mines were the Pride of the Mountain, Winnemucca and Union. The ores, though supposed to be rich, were too refractory to be worked by mill process. In 1869, the first-named mine reduced eighty-seven tons of ore, producing $5,220. The following year (1870) the Winnemucca reduced sixty-eight tons, producing $3,285.76 140 tons in the Union claim produced $2,629.51. The country rock is a hard slate, containing sulphurets of iron. Considerable money has been expended in developing or testing the mines. 200 tons of ore from the Pride of the Mountain produced $80 to $175 per ton. The ore is a chloride, carrying horn silver. During the years 1875-76 about $40,000 in bullion was produced in this district. No bullion was reported for 1880.

    * * * A picturesque and beautiful village containing some 200 well-built houses, some of which are handsome edifices, and many beautiful gardens that attest the taste and industry of the inhabitants. A beautiful, crystal stream of water diverted from its natural course runs, a little babbling stream, through every street. * * * Humboldt City contains two hotels, kept in good style, one the Coulter House, by Mr. and Mrs. Bailey Nichols, the other, the Iowa House, by Mr. and Mrs. Wilson two saloons, one by Messrs. Sylvester & Helmer, gentlemen ready to argue or fight for their politics, or deal out red-eye to their numerous thirsty customers, the other by Messrs. Wilson & Coulter one blacksmith’s shop, by Daniels & Cooper, who will at any moment stop shoeing a refractory horse to spin a yarn two stores with large and well-selected stocks of goods four families (five or six more are on the road for this place) and children, chickens, pigs, and dogs enough to give the place a lively appearance.

    LOVELOCK is a station on the Central Pacific Railroad seventy-three miles southwest of Winnemucca, and near the south line of Humboldt County. Those who crossed the plains in an early day will remember this as the place where hundreds of emigrants were compelled to leave their worn-out teams, wagons, and the remains of their outfit, to be appropriated by any who liked, and to make the balance of their way on foot to California. Guns, pistols, clothing, carpenter’s tools, and every conceivable thing with which they had loaded their wagons in Missouri were thrown away to put themselves in light marching order for the balance of the trip. The valley here capable of cultivation is some thirty miles long and twelve miles wide, the Humboldt River running along its southeastern side. The first permanent settlers were induced to come here in consequence of the location of a station for the overland stage at this point. James Blake located in April, 1861, being joined by George Lovelock and others the following year. In 1866 the Central Pacific Railroad Company established a station here for the convenience of the people doing business in the Trinity Mining District, and a small town, numbering about sixty inhabitants, was the result. The neighborhood is thickly settled, so that about fifty children attend school. The school house is large and commodious, 30x80 feet, divided into two portions. Church service and Sunday-school is regularly held in one of the rooms by the Wesleyan Methodists, the Sunday-school attendance being usually about forty, children and teachers. The taxable property of the town, exclusive of the railroad property, is about $70,000. There are about four miles of streets in the aggregate, partly shaded with locusts and other trees. The buildings of the town are generally constructed of wood, some few being of stone. The lumber for building is brought by railroad from the Sierra Nevada. The name of the post-office and station is Lovelock. The town has four stores, three hotels, two saloons, one livery stable, and one blacksmith’s shop. The locality is considered healthy, a light malarial fever in the autumn being the worst to be apprehended. The town has a good reputation for peace and sobriety, there being but one homicide on record. This was the killing of Patrick Tulley, July 28, 1880, by Robert St. Clair, with a pistol-shot, for which the latter was sentenced to the penitentiary for twenty-five years. There have been no lynchings or mob demonstrations in the place, nor disastrous fires or floods. The valley around the town contains about 400 inhabitants, most of them being engaged in stock-raising and farming 6,000 head of cattle are pastured in the valley and adjoining mountains. Among the prominent stock-raisers are: Marzen, who owns 2,000 head Marker Brothers, 2,000, and Carpenter & Lowery, 1,000. Of grain 1,500 tons are usually grown in the valley, Joseph Marzen, the largest stock-raiser, owns 1,200 acres of highly improved land, the Marker Brothers, about 1,000. The prospects of the valley are hopeful, in view of the immense mineral resources in the vicinity. On the north the Trinity Mining District, which has an inexhaustible supply of smelting ore, containing lead, antimony and silver, at no distant day must be a source of much wealth. Thirty miles south are mines rich in copper, which are also promising elements in the future of the place. Six miles south are beds of salt, soda, gypsum and saltpetre, which will eventually become valuable. MILL CITY was started in 1863, in anticipation of the Humboldt Canal, and thereby becoming a center for the reduction of the ores of the Buena Vista and Star districts, which were distant from six to twenty miles. The water, however, never reached the place, and the town became a shipping place for the mines in the vicinity of Unionville. The present population is about fifty, It has a store for general merchandise, one hotel, saloon, livery stable, blacksmith, and foundry also, telegraph, express and post-office. It is supplied with water by the Mill City Water Works. The town claims to be the healthiest in the world, having so far no necessity for starting a cemetery.


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    Contents

      (1866–1867, reestablished as Etowah County a year later) (1868–1874, renamed Chilton County) (1832–1858, named for Thomas Hart Benton, Creek War officer and U.S. Senator, renamed Calhoun County in 1858 for John C. Calhoun) (1818–1820, renamed Bibb County) (1818–1821, renamed Morgan County) (1821–1825, land redistributed between Madison and Jackson counties) (1850–1858, renamed Winston County) (Feb–Nov 1867, area was reestablished in Oct 1868 as Sanford County and then renamed Lamar County in 1877) (Aug–Oct 1868, Covington County was briefly renamed Jones County then changed back) (1868–1877, renamed Lamar County)

    Alaska has never created counties. Under Section 9 of the 1912 organic act creating the Territory of Alaska, Alaska was prohibited from establishing counties without explicit approval from the U.S. Congress. The framers of the Constitution of Alaska chose to forgo consideration of a county system in favor of a system of boroughs, both organized and unorganized. In 1961, the Alaska Legislature formalized the borough structure to encompass multiple, separate organized boroughs and a single unorganized borough. Alaska currently has 18 organized boroughs. The United States Census Bureau, beginning with the 1970 United States Census, divided the Unorganized Borough into census areas. The boundaries of these census areas were largely based upon the early election districts of the state, which in turn were largely based upon the recording districts of the territory. Following is a list of former boroughs in Alaska:

      –Eagle River Borough (1974–1975, incorporation invalidated by the Alaska Supreme Court) [1]
  • Greater Anchorage Area Borough (1964–1975, succeeded by Municipality of Anchorage)
  • Greater Juneau Borough [2] (1963–1970, succeeded by City and Borough of Juneau)
  • Greater Sitka Borough [3] (1963–1971, succeeded by City and Borough of Sitka)
  • The Haines Borough was incorporated in 1968 as a third-class borough. Through consolidation, this municipality was dissolved, along with the City of Haines, in 2002. A home rule borough, also called the Haines Borough, was incorporated in the place of these two municipalities.
    • [4] (1873–1875, renamed Clay County) [5] (1873–1885, renamed Cleveland County) (1827–1828) most of the county was lost to Oklahoma due to the Cherokee Treaty of 1828, the remainder became Washington County (1820–1838, became part of Indian Territory and present-day Texas) [6] (1871–1875, renamed Logan County)
      – created in 1851 from the northern half of Trinity County. In 1874 it was divided between Humboldt and Siskiyou counties. – created by the California legislature in 1852 out of territory the state believed would be ceded to it east of Lake Tahoe, but which was given to Nevada. The county was never officially organized. – created in 1864 by the California legislature out of territory of Tulare County on the east slope of the Sierra Nevada but was never officially organized. The region was later organized in 1866 as Inyo County with additions from Los Angeles and San Bernardino counties. – created in 1855 by the California legislature out of the southeastern territory of Tulare County on the west of the Sierra Nevada but was never officially organized. Some of that region was later organized as Kern County in 1866, with additions from Los Angeles and San Bernardino counties.

    Colorado Territory was formed from the lands of four organized territories: Kansas to the southeast, New Mexico to the south, Utah to the west, and Nebraska to the northeast. Before Colorado Territory was organized, all of these except Nebraska had declared county boundaries that included part of modern-day Colorado.

    Counties formed by New Mexico Territory Edit

      was originally one of the seven partidos of the Spanish, and later Mexican, province of Nuevo México. One of the nine original counties created by the U.S. Territory of New Mexico on January 29, 1852 ceased to have jurisdiction over Colorado in 1861. was split from Taos County and San Miguel County on February 1, 1860, and ceased to have jurisdiction over Colorado in 1861.

    Counties formed by Utah Territory Edit

    On March 3, 1852, the following counties were organized by Utah Territory, with boundaries reaching into what is now western Colorado:

    Upon the organization of Colorado Territory in 1861, which became law on February 28, these counties ceased to have jurisdiction in Colorado.

    Green River County was also created on March 3, 1852, but never organized it was dissolved in 1857 and recreated in 1859. After losing land to Colorado Territory in 1861 and Wyoming Territory in 1868, Green River County was finally dissolved in 1872.

    Beaver County was formed on January 5, 1856 from parts of Iron and Millard counties, and like other Utah counties, ceased to have jurisdiction in Colorado.

    Counties created by Kansas Territory Edit

    Kansas Territory's western reaches encompassed the mining centers of Aurora and Pike's Peak. Beginning with the massive Arapahoe County, Kansas Territory provided for a number of counties in what would become Colorado, but organized none of them before achieving statehood in 1861.

    Arapahoe County was proclaimed August 25, 1855 but never organized it reverted to unorganized territory when Kansas joined the Union on January 29, 1861. On February 7, 1859, several counties were split from Arapahoe County none of them were organized, and also reverted to unorganized territory when Kansas became a state. They were:

    Peketon County was created on the same day in 1859, but never organized. Like Arapahoe and its daughter counties, it reverted to unorganized territory upon Kansas achieving statehood.

    Note on Nebraska Territory Edit

    No counties were organized in Nebraska Territory's portion of the future Colorado Territory.

    Counties created by the Provisional Territory of Jefferson Edit

    On November 28, 1859, the Provisional General Assembly of the extralegal Territory of Jefferson proclaimed the boundaries of 12 counties:

    It was never recognized by Federal authorities, but the provisional government of the Territory of Jefferson held effective control of what became Colorado for a year and a half. Although the act establishing the Colorado Territory became law on February 28, 1861, the first Federal governor, William Gilpin, did not arrive in Denver until late May, and the Jefferson government disbanded itself on June 6, 1861. In November 1861, Colorado's territorial legislature would establish counties of its own, with many boundaries following those of the Jefferson counties.

    Counties created by Colorado Territory Edit

      (November 1–7, 1861), was one of the 17 original counties created by the Territory of Colorado. The county was renamed Conejos County after only six days. (February 11, 1870 to February 6, 1874), was created from former Cheyenne and Arapaho tribal land and the eastern portion of Huerfano County. The county was abolished four years later, and its territory split between Elbert County and Bent County. (February 9, 1872 to February 9, 1874), was created from the eastern portion of Weld County. The county was abolished two years later after organizers failed to secure voter approval, and the territory of the county was returned to Weld County.

    Counties created by the State of Colorado Edit

      (February 8–10, 1879). Lake County was renamed Carbonate County in 1879. Only two days later, Carbonate County was split into the new Chaffee County and a reestablished Lake County. (February 27 to March 2, 1883). Ouray County was renamed Uncompaghre County for only four days in 1883. (November 15, 1902, to April 11, 1903), was one of three counties created from Arapahoe County in 1902. The name was changed back to Arapahoe County after five months.

    The United States Census Bureau and the Office of Management and Budget currently consider the District of Columbia to consist of a single county equivalent. Otherwise the District of Columbia currently has no counties or county equivalents. The former counties of the District of Columbia are:

      (1791–1846) retroceded to Virginia becoming Alexandria County, Virginia. Abolished in 1871 and consolidated with the District of Columbia. Under the current (2001, revised through 2005) District of Columbia Code, the entire District of Columbia is a single body corporate for district purposes the code does not mention Washington County except to make the District of Columbia the successor in title to its property.

    Georgetown City and Washington City are former county equivalents. The District of Columbia comprised three county equivalents when it was consolidated in 1871: Georgetown City, Washington City, and the Remainder of the District—as they are termed in the Ninth Census of the United States (1870). There had been four county equivalents in the District prior to the retrocession of Alexandria to Virginia in 1846. In its retrospective decennial population counts the Ninth Census lists four for 1840 back to 1810, Alexandria and Washington counties alone for 1800, and none for 1790 prior to the creation of the district.

      , named for Missouri Senator Thomas Hart Benton in 1844, renamed Hernando County in 1850 [7] became parts of Jackson, Calhoun and Gulf counties in 1833 renamed Orange County, Florida in 1845. renamed Bradford County, Florida in 1861.
      (organized by Georgia in 1785 out of disputed Yazoo lands in present-day Mississippi dissolved in 1788) [8] (1828–1931) merged with Fulton County (1832–1861) renamed Bartow County (1853–1856) renamed Webster County (1857–1931) merged with Fulton County (1803–1818) merged with Buncombe County, North Carolina
      (1864–1895) reduced greatly in size at creation of Elmore County and Logan County in 1889. In 1891, an attempt was made to transfer to Alta County, declared unconstitutional. Transferred to Blaine County in 1895 (1864–1867) absorbed by Nez Perce and Kootenai County. (1889–1895) In 1891, an attempt was made to transfer territory to Lincoln County and Alta County. Act declared unconstitutional. In 1895, the Idaho Legislature combined Logan and Alturas Counties into a new county called Blaine
    • Alta County created from Alturas in 1891, Act declared unconstitutional in May, 1891.

    Revolutionary era Edit

      , formed in 1778 to govern Virginia's claims to present-day Illinois, Indiana, Michigan, Ohio, Wisconsin and eastern Minnesota county abolished 5 January 1782 territory ceded by Virginia to Congress in March 1784. Its effective reach was limited to the French settlements at Cahokia, Kaskaskia, and Vincennes.

    Former counties of the Northwest and Indiana territories Edit

    Before Illinois Territory was created in 1809, it was part of the Northwest Territory from 1788 to 1800, and Indiana Territory from 1800 to 1809. At first, two counties of the Northwest Territory were created to govern what became the modern state of Illinois, followed by two others:

      established April 27, 1790, later St. Clair County, Indiana Territory upon the organization of Indiana Territory in 1800, St. Clair County was enlarged to take in present-day Wisconsin, eastern Minnesota, and the western portion of Michigan's Upper Peninsula. When Illinois Territory was set off from the Indiana Territory in 1809, St. Clair County was included in the new government. , established June 20, 1790, later Knox County, Indiana Territory, 1800 its boundaries in 1795 included the eastern half of the future state of Illinois. Portions of Knox County would be transferred to Michigan Territory upon its organization in 1805 and to Illinois Territory upon its organization in 1809 the remainder was included in the state of Indiana upon its achieving statehood in 1816. , proclaimed 1795, from part of St. Clair County transferred to Indiana Territory in 1800 and Illinois Territory in 1809, now Randolph County, Illinois. , proclaimed on August 15, 1796 following the British evacuation of Detroit out of portions of Hamilton County, Northwest Territory and unorganized land, mostly in the present-day Lower Peninsula of Michigan. This first Wayne County originally included a slice of the present Lake Michigan shoreline of Illinois, the site of present-day Chicago its lands would be transferred to Knox County, Indiana Territory and later, the Illinois Territory. Transferred to Indiana Territory in 1803 and to Michigan Territory in 1805.

    Counties organized by Illinois Territory Edit

    Other counties were organized by the Illinois Territory from the lands of St. Clair County between 1812 and 1819 and notionally included parts of the future Michigan, Minnesota, and Wisconsin territories in their boundaries:

    Before Illinois achieved statehood in 1818, the part of Illinois Territory excluded from the new state (Wisconsin, eastern Minnesota, and the western Upper Peninsula of Michigan) was transferred to Michigan Territory. No county governments were included in this transfer.

    Revolutionary era Edit

      , formed in 1778 to govern Virginia's claims to present-day Illinois, Indiana, Michigan, Ohio, Wisconsin and eastern Minnesota county abolished 5 January 1782 territory ceded by Virginia to Congress in March 1784. Its effective reach was limited to the French settlements at Cahokia, Kaskaskia, and Vincennes.

    Former counties of the Northwest and Indiana territories Edit

    Indiana Territory was created in 1800, and had since 1788 been part of the Northwest Territory the new territory included modern-day Illinois, Indiana, Wisconsin and eastern Minnesota, as well at the western Upper Peninsula of Michigan. At first, one county of the Northwest Territory had been created to govern what became the modern state of Indiana, and three others would be included in the Indiana Territory:

      , established June 20, 1790, later Knox County, Indiana Territory, 1800 its boundaries in 1795 included the eastern half of the future state of Illinois, and its 1800 boundaries included the western half of Michigan's Lower Peninsula. The northern portions of Knox County would be transferred to Michigan Territory upon its organization in 1805, and the westernmost to Illinois Territory upon its organization in 1809 the remainder was included in the state of Indiana upon its achieving statehood in 1816. The county's current form is that of Knox County, Indiana. established April 27, 1790, later St. Clair County, Indiana Territory upon the organization of Indiana Territory in 1800, St. Clair County was included in the new territory and enlarged to take in present-day Wisconsin, eastern Minnesota, and the western portion of Michigan's Upper Peninsula. When Illinois Territory was set off from the Indiana Territory in 1809, St. Clair County was included in the new government. , proclaimed 1795, from part of St. Clair County transferred to Indiana Territory in 1800 and Illinois Territory in 1809, now Randolph County, Illinois. , proclaimed on August 15, 1796 following the British evacuation of Detroit out of portions of Hamilton County, Northwest Territory and unorganized land, mostly in the present-day Lower Peninsula of Michigan. This first Wayne County originally included a slice of northern Indiana all of Wayne County west of the present Indiana–Ohio line was transferred to Knox County, Indiana Territory in 1800. After losing other lands to the new state of Ohio, the remaining portion of Wayne County was transferred to Indiana Territory in 1803 and to Michigan Territory in 1805. The current Wayne County, Michigan is considered a successor of the 1796 establishment.

    Former districts of the Louisiana Territory Edit

      , attached to Indiana Territory October 1, 1804, pending the organization of Louisiana Territory, which took place July 4, 1805.

    Former counties of the State of Indiana Edit

      , name changed to Howard County in 1859. , Original Newton County abolished in 1839. Current County recreated in 1859 as the last county in Indiana.

    Counties of Iowa created by Michigan Territory Edit

      was organized in 1834, became part of Wisconsin Territory in 1836, and is now Des Moines County, Iowa was organized in 1834, became part of Wisconsin Territory in 1836, and is now Dubuque County, Iowa

    Counties of Iowa created by Wisconsin Territory Edit

      , 1836 see Henry County, Iowa , 1836 see Lee County, Iowa , 1836 see Louisa County, Iowa , 1836 see Muscatine County, Iowa , 1836 see Van Buren County, Iowa , 1836 see Henry County, Iowa , 1837 see Benton County, Iowa , 1837 see Buchanan County, Iowa , 1837 see Cedar County, Iowa , 1837 see Clayton County, Iowa , 1837 see Clinton County, Iowa , 1837 see Delaware County, Iowa , 1837 see Fayette County, Iowa , 1837 see Jackson County, Iowa , 1837 see Johnson County, Iowa , 1837 see Jones County, Iowa , 1837 see Keokuk County, Iowa , 1836 see Linn County, Iowa , 1837 see Scott County, Iowa , 1838 see Washington County, Iowa

    Former counties of the State of Iowa Edit

      was established in 1851. It was abolished in 1857 and the area was joined to Kossuth County. was created in 1870 out of Kossuth County from portions of what had been Bancroft County. It was merged back into Kossuth County in 1871. was established on January 15, 1851 on January 12, 1853, its name was changed to Woodbury County.

    Counties created by Kansas Territory Edit

    Several counties were created by the government of Kansas Territory in its western reaches, which included the mining districts of Auraria and Pike's Peak. None were ever organized, and all reverted to unorganized territory when Kansas achieved statehood in 1861. See also the Colorado section, above.

      , covered all of western Kansas Territory when it was proclaimed on August 25, 1855. On February 7, 1859, the following counties were created from parts of Arapahoe County:

    Counties created by the State of Kansas Edit

      , now a part of Finney County (1875)
    • Sequoyah County, Kansas, now part of Finney County
    • Kansas County, Kansas, now part of Seward County
    • Buffalo County, Kansas
    • Madison County, Kansas, now part of Lyon and Greenwood Counties
    • Irving County, Kansas

    Because Kentucky began as a political dependency of Virginia, its earliest counties were organized by that government. See also Virginia & Virginia Colony, below

    Historic counties created by Virginia Edit

      , proclaimed 1772, divided in 1776 into Montgomery, Washington, and Kentucky counties. had boundaries much the same as today's Commonwealth of Kentucky.

    Modern counties created by Virginia Edit

    In 1780, Kentucky County was divided by the Virginia government into three counties:

    Between 1784 and 1788, six more counties would be created in Kentucky by the Virginia authorities:

      in 1784, from part of Jefferson County in 1785, from part of Fayette County in 1785, from part of Lincoln County in 1785, from part of Lincoln County in 1788, from part of Bourbon County in 1788, from part of Fayette County

    These nine counties gained statehood in 1792 as the Commonwealth of Kentucky.

    Former counties created by the Commonwealth of Kentucky Edit

      (1904) was dissolved by the Kentucky Court of Appeals on April 29, 1904, because it was not created in conformance with state law

    (Josh Bell County, Kentucky (1867–1873), originally named for Joshua Fry Bell, was called simply Bell County beginning in 1873.)

    The Territory of Orleans was divided into 12 counties on 10 Apr 1805 these were reorganized into parishes on 31 Mar 1807:

    Former parishes Edit

      formed in 1811 from West Florida territory. It was eliminated in 1812 when part of the former West Florida area was transferred to Mississippi Territory. [9] formed in 1838 from part of Ouachita Parish. In 1877, it was divided into East Carroll Parish and West Carroll Parish. [9] formed in 1810 from West Florida territory. In 1824, it was divided into East Feliciana Parish and West Feliciana Parish. [9] formed in 1811 from West Florida territory. It was eliminated in 1812 when part of the former West Florida area was transferred to Mississippi Territory. [9] formed in 1811 from part of Concordia Parish, and merged into Concordia Parish and Ouachita Parish in 1814. [9]
      , established 1665, transferred to the Dominion of New England in 1686 to the Province of Massachusetts Bay in 1692 and absorbed into York County (see below). (1674–1675)

    Counties organized by Massachusetts in the future State of Maine Edit

    The following counties of Massachusetts were organized by the 1780 constitution into the District of Maine, which became a state in 1820:

      , created 1652 as "Yorkshire County" and renamed "York County" in 1668 , created 1760 , created 1761 , created 1790 , created 1790 , created 1799 , created 1805 , created 1809 , created 1817
      : formed in 1650 from part of Saint Mary's County. Abolished in 1654. Referred to as Old Charles County. : formed in 1669 from part of Somerset County and nonorganized territory. Abolished in 1672 and incorporated in Worcester County. Originally also included portions of Maryland's claim to Delaware. : formed in 1672 from part of Durham County and nonorganized territory. Lost in 1685 when Delaware Colony was established.

    Former counties of the colonial era Edit

      , an original county of the Massachusetts Bay Colony, established 1643 divided in 1680 between Essex County and the newly formed Province of New Hampshire no connection with the Norfolk County organized in 1793 (1674–1675)

    Counties transferred from other colonies Edit

    Counties organized by Massachusetts in the future State of Maine Edit

    The following counties of Massachusetts were organized by the 1780 constitution into the District of Maine, which became a state in 1820:

      , created 1652 as "Yorkshire County" and renamed "York County" in 1668 , created 1760 , created 1761 , created 1790 , created 1790 , created 1799 , created 1805 , created 1809 , created 1817

    Revolutionary era Edit

      , formed 1778 in support of Virginia's claim to present-day Illinois, Indiana, Michigan, Ohio, Wisconsin and eastern Minnesota abolished 5 January 1782 territory ceded by Virginia to Congress in March 1784. Throughout this time, Detroit and Fort St. Joseph (present-day Niles, Michigan) were occupied by British forces, and Virginia's jurisdiction in the region was therefore limited to the French settlements of Cahokia, Kaskaskia and Vincennes, far to the south of Michigan.

    Former counties of the Northwest, Indiana and Illinois territories Edit

      , proclaimed on August 15, 1796 following the British evacuation of Detroit out of portions of Hamilton County, Northwest Territory and unorganized land. This first Wayne County originally encompassed all of Michigan's Lower Peninsula, including northwestern Ohio, northern Indiana, and a small portion of the present Lake Michigan shoreline of Illinois, the site of present-day Chicago. In 1800, the area west of the extension of the present Indiana–Ohio border became part of Knox County, Indiana Territory, and a section in the east of the county's Ohio lands was included as part of the new Trumbull County. This first Wayne County was split upon Ohio's achievement of statehood in 1803 north of the Ordinance Line became part of Indiana Territory as a reorganized Wayne County the county's remaining lands in Ohio briefly reverted to an unorganized status. , established 1803 as a revival of the former county government, and included in Michigan Territory upon its creation in 1805. , established as Knox County, Northwest Territory in 1790 upon the organization of Indiana Territory, Knox County was enlarged to take in the western side of the Lower Peninsula and a large slice of the Upper Peninsula. It is unknown if Knox County ever exercised jurisdiction over its lands in the future Michigan. , established as St. Clair County, Northwest Territory in 1790 upon the organization of Indiana Territory, St. Clair County was enlarged to take in the western portion of the Upper Peninsula. When Illinois Territory was set off from the Indiana Territory in 1809, St. Clair County was included in the new government. It can be presumed that this St. Clair County never exercised jurisdiction over its share of the future Michigan, due to the lack of non-native settlers.

    Other counties organized by the Illinois Territory between 1809 and 1819, including Madison, Crawford, Bond, and Edwards, notionally included parts of the future Michigan and Wisconsin territories in their boundaries, but do not appear to have exercised jurisdiction north of the current state line.

    Former districts of Michigan Territory Edit

    The first governor of Michigan Territory, William Hull, declared a county government into existence shortly after assuming power in 1805, but on the same day, ordered that four districts be organized:

    • District of Detroit, the area surrounding the settlement at Detroit in practice, this district was combined with the Huron district.
    • District of Erie, the area south of the Huron River and centered on present-day Monroe
    • District of Huron, the area north of Detroit, encompassing today's Thumb (Michigan) and Mid-Michigan
    • District of Michilimackinac, centered on the Straits of Mackinac and covering the northern half of the Lower Peninsula

    Judicial acts and militia organization took place at the district level the vestigial county government was never organized. District government lapsed after the British occupation of Detroit and Mackinac in 1812 following the recapture of Detroit in 1813, Hull's replacement as governor (by American reckoning), Lewis Cass, abolished the district scheme. In 1815, the current Wayne County was organized the county government traces its lineage to the 1796 county of that name.

    Former counties of Michigan Territory Edit

      , organized 1818, transferred to Wisconsin Territory in 1836, now Brown County, Wisconsin , organized 1818, transferred to Wisconsin Territory in 1836, now Crawford County, Wisconsin , organized 1834, transferred to Wisconsin Territory in 1836 and Iowa Territory in 1838, now Des Moines County, Iowa , organized 1834, transferred to Wisconsin Territory in 1836 and Iowa Territory in 1838, now Dubuque County, Iowa , organized 1829, transferred to Wisconsin Territory in 1836, now Iowa County, Wisconsin , organized 1835, transferred to Wisconsin Territory in 1836, now Milwaukee County, Wisconsin

    Former counties of the State of Michigan Edit

      , abolished in 1897, assigned to Keweenaw County, Michigan , abolished in 1895, divided between Charlevoix and Leelanau counties , formed in 1867 from Marquette County, Michigan but declared unconstitutional
      (1857–1858) disorganized and shifted between three counties it became part of Anoka County in 1869–1870 (1861–1870) merged with Kandiyohi County (1849–1858, reconstituted as Pembina County, Dakota Territory in 1861, eventually reduced to present-day Pembina County, North Dakota.)
      (organized by Georgia in 1785 out of disputed Yazoo lands in present-day Mississippi dissolved in 1788) (1872–1878), later reformed as Pearl River County in 1890

    Three Alabama counties were established in the Mississippi Territory that preceded the two states: Baldwin County, Alabama Madison County, Alabama Washington County, Alabama.

      , created from a small portion of Nye County, Nevada in 1987, reabsorbed in 1989. Population: 0. , now independent city of Carson City – created by the California legislature out of territory the state believed would be ceded to it north of Lake Tahoe, but which was given to Nevada. County never officially organized. – Portions west of 120°W became Lassen County, California, remainder annexed by Washoe County, Nevada in 1883. Also known as Lake County.
      (renamed and partitioned). See Washington County, New York. (transferred to Massachusetts in 1686). (claimed by and transferred to Vermont, unclear if ever implemented or administered). See Albany County, New York. (transferred to Massachusetts in 1691). (claimed by and transferred to Vermont, unclear if ever implemented or administered). (renamed and partitioned). See also: Montgomery County, New York (original English county, partitioned in 1683 into Kings, Queens (including modern Nassau), Suffolk, Richmond and Westchester (including modern Bronx) counties.)

    Counties formed by the colonial government Edit

      , created 1664, abolished 1739 , created 1696, abolished 1739 , created 1758, effective 1759 lost territory to Wayne County in 1779, remainder of county divided in 1791 between Glasgow (see below) and Lenoir counties , created 1764, divided in 1779 into Franklin and Warren counties created 1768, effective 1769 divided in 1779 into Lincoln and Rutherford counties

    Counties transferred to Federal jurisdiction, 1790 Edit

    Seven counties were established by the State of North Carolina in its western territories following independence the entire overmountain area (the former Washington District), was transferred to Federal jurisdiction in 1790 and formed into the Territory South of the River Ohio. The so-called Southwest Territory would achieve statehood in 1796, as Tennessee.

      , established 1777 (not to be confused with the present-day Washington County, NC, which was created in 1799 from Tyrrell County, though both counties are named for the same person). , established 1779 , established 1783 (not to be confused with the present-day Davidson County, NC, which was created in 1822 from Rowan County, though both counties are named for the same person). , established 1783 (not to be confused with the present-day Greene County, NC, which was created in 1791 from Dobbs County, though both counties are named for the same person). , established 1786 , established 1786 , established 1788, divided at Tennessee statehood in 1796 into Montgomery County, Tennessee and Robertson County, Tennessee

    Renamed counties Edit

      (1849–1858, reconstituted as Pembina County, Dakota Territory in 1861, eventually reduced to present-day Pembina County, North Dakota.) (1883–1889 under Dakota Territory, 1889–1896, 1901–1905 under North Dakota, created from Howard County, Dakota Territory, extinct in 1896 from Billings and Stark counties, recreated in 1901 but again absorbed into McKenzie county in 1905.)
      , formed in 1778 and constituted most of present-day Illinois, Indiana, Michigan, Ohio, and Wisconsin abolished 5 January 1782 territory ceded by Virginia to Congress in March 1784 see Illinois Country.

    Indian Territory Edit

    Chickasaw Nation Edit

    Choctaw Nation Edit

    Oklahoma Territory Edit

      created 1851, gradually reduced in size until 1862, when what remained was incorporated into Douglas County[10]
    • Champooik or Champoeg County, one of the four original districts into which the Oregon Country was divided in 1843 Renamed Marion County in 1849. [11]
    • Twality, Tuality or Falatine County, one of the four original districts into which the Oregon Country was divided in 1843 Renamed Washington County in 1849. [12]
    • Bartholomew County created in 1785 from Charleston District. Abolished 1791. [13]
    • Beaufort District created in 1768 from Granville County. Abolished 1800. [13]
    • Berkeley (1) County created in 1682 from Craven County. Abolished 1768. [13]
    • Berkeley (2) County created in 1785 from Charleston District. Abolished 1791. The third version of Berkeley County was created in 1882 and remains today. [13]
    • Camden District created in 1768 from Craven County. Abolished 1800. [13]
    • Carteret County created in 1684 from Colleton County. Abolished 1708. [13]
    • Charles Town District created in 1768 from Berkeley and Colleton Counties. It was renamed Charleston District in 1785, and abolished in 1800. [13]
    • Charleston (1) County created in 1785 from Charleston District. Abolished 1791. A second Charleston County was created in 1800 and remains today. [13]
    • Cheraws District created in 1768 from Craven County. Abolished 1800. [13] created in 1785 from Camden County. Abolished 1800. [13]
    • Clarendon (1) County created in 1785 from Camden County. Its county seat was in Jamesville. Abolished 1800. Clarendon (2) County was reestablished in 1855 with its county seat in Manning and remains today. [13]
    • Colleton (1) County created in 1682 from Craven County. Abolished 1768. [13]
    • Colleton (2) County created in 1785 from Charleston District. Abolished 1791. A third Colleton County was created in 1800 from Charleston District and remains today. [13]
    • Craven County was part of Carolina's first charter in 1664. Abolished 1768. [13]
    • Georgetown District created in 1768 from Craven County. Abolished 1800. [13]
    • Granville (1) County created in 1708 from Carteret County. Abolished 1768. [13]
    • Granville (2) County created in 1785 from Beaufort District. Abolished 1791. [13]
    • Hilton County created in 1785 from Beaufort District. Abolished 1791. [13]
    • Kingston County created in 1785 from Georgetown District. Abolished 1801. [13]
    • Lewisburg County created in 1785 from Orangeburg District. Abolished 1791. [13]
    • Lexington (1) County created in 1785 from Orangeburg District. Abolished 1791. Lexington (2) County was reestablished in 1804 from Orangeburg County and remains today. [13]
    • Liberty County created in 1785 from Georgetown District. Abolished 1798. [13]
    • Lincoln County created in 1785 from Beaufort District. Abolished 1791. [13]
    • Marion County created in 1785 from Charleston District. Abolished 1791. [13] created in 1768 from Indian lands. Abolished 1800. [13]
    • Orangeburgh District created in 1768 from Orangeburgh Township and Amelia Township. Spelling officially changed to Orangeburg District in 1783. Abolished 1800. [13]
    • Orange County created in 1785 from Orangeburg District. Abolished 1791. (Note:Orangeburg County was created in 1791 from Orangeburg District and remains today.) [13]
    • Pendleton County was created in 1789 from Cherokee Indian lands. It was joined to the overarching Washington District in 1791 along with Greenville County. In 1798 Washington District was renamed Pendleton District an overarching district including Pendleton County and Greenville County. In 1800 South Carolina abolished all the overarching districts. So in 1800 only the separate Pendleton County and Greenville County emerged. The remaining Pendleton County was abolished in 1826. [13]
    • Pendleton District was created in 1798 by renaming Washington District. This overarching Pendleton District was dissolved two years later in 1800. However Pendleton County remained and emerged from a part of Pendleton District. Pendleton County was abolished 1826. [13]
    • Pinckney District created in 1791 from Ninety-six District and Cheraws District. Abolished 1800. [13] created in 1792 from Claremont County and Clarendon County. Abolished 1800. [13]
    • Shrewsbury County created in 1785 from Beaufort District. Abolished 1791. [13]
    • Spartan County created in 1785 from Ninety-six District. Changed to Spartanburg County in 1791 and remains today. [13]
    • Washington County created in 1785 from Charleston District. Abolished 1791. [13] created in 1791 from Cherokee Indian lands. Washington District included Greenville County (created 1786) and Pendleton County (created 1789) Washington District was renamed in 1798 to Pendleton District. [13]
    • Winton County created in 1785 from Orangeburg District. Abolished 1791. [13]
    • Winyah County created in 1785 from Georgetown District. Abolished 1800. [13]
      (1889–1979) The eastern part of the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation is now under the control of Jackson County. Armstrong County was disorganized in 1952.
    • Washington County, South Dakota, a former county (1883–1943) that was divided and then merged into Jackson County, Pennington County, and Shannon County in 1943 because of financial troubles in South Dakota (1875–2015) renamed Oglala Lakota County by referendum in 2014.
      (1870–1919) – Now part of Hamilton County and Bradley County. The county seat was Ooltewah. (1788–1796) – A North Carolina county that was divided and renamed Montgomery County and Robertson County when Tennessee achieved statehood to lessen confusion. These counties still exist but were eventually subdivided further.
      (1858–1861), renamed to Stephens County (1887–1897, formed from part of Presidio County, absorbed by Brewster County) (1858–1866, became parts of Uvalde and Kinney counties not to be confused with present-day Dawson County) (1861–1871), reverted to previously named Cass County (1856–1899, absorbed by Webb County) (1887–1897, formed from part of Presidio County, absorbed by Brewster County) (1888–1895, transferred to Oklahoma Territory under a Supreme Court decision) (1836–1839), renamed to Harris County (1820–1825, became part of Indian Territory and present-day Texas) (1841–1842), renamed to Brazos County (1848–1850, abolished November 25, 1850 land ceded to United States in compliance with Compromise of 1850) (1873–1876, abolished by Texas Legislature) (1850, formed from part of Santa Fe County, abolished November 25, 1850 land ceded to United States in compliance with Compromise of 1850)

    In 1849 most Great Basin settlers asked for admission to the Union as the State of Deseret. In 1850 Congress responded by reducing her size and organizing Utah Territory. In 1896 Utah became a state.


    Odometer Fraud & the Law

    When a vehicle is sold or a title is transferred, the law requires written documentation of the total mileage as recorded on the odometer. If the odometer mileage is known to be incorrect for any reason, the seller is required to provide a written statement of this knowledge on the title to the buyer.

    Often, odometer fraud is done in conjunction with other crimes in order to make a used vehicle appear to be newer or have less wear than it actually does. These may include:

    • The reconditioning of the external appearance of the vehicle.
    • Changing title paperwork to conceal the actual mileage reported at the time of sale.
    • Title fraud includes:
      • Altering the title.
      • Forging the title.
      • Replacing the title document.
      • Destroying original title documents.
      • Obtaining duplicate certificates from state DMVs.
      • Entering a false, lower mileage.

      After you've paid of a loan on your car, the lienholder should send you the title reflecting the satisfaction of the lien. Complete the “lien" section on the title, and write “none" where it indicates a lienholder.

      If the lienholder did not have the title, they can complete and send you a Lien Release (Form VP186).

      Submit all documents, along with payment for the $21 fee, to the DMV:

      • In person to your local DMV office.
      • By mail to:
        • Department of Motor Vehicles
        • Title Processing
        • 555 Wright Way
        • Carson City, NV 89711

        You should receive a “clear" title with 6 weeks.


        CDL Offices Top ↑

        For general questions on commercial licensing, send an email or call one of our main numbers:

        Las Vegas area (702) 486-4368 option 1
        Reno/Sparks/Carson City (775) 684-4368 option 1

        Do not visit a DMV full service office for CDL transactions.

        Services are offered on a walk-in basis. The DMV observes social distancing limits set by each county in Nevada and the latest mask guidance from the CDC. Please stay home if you are not well.

        Skills Tests

        Use the office phone numbers below only to schedule your test. You must pass any required knowledge test before scheduling a skills test. See Fees for fee information.

        All vehicles must be empty. Placarded tankers must provide a purge certificate. No loaded vehicles will be allowed.

        Carson City
        555 Wright Way
        Carson City, NV 89711-0400
        8a-5p M-F | Get Map
        (775) 684-4861

        Elko
        3920 E. Idaho Street
        Elko, NV 89801-4970
        8a-5p M-F | Get Map
        (775) 753-1126

        North Las Vegas
        4110 Donovan Way
        North Las Vegas, NV 89030
        8a-5p M-F | Get Map
        (702) 486-5655 option 4

        Reno
        890 Trademark Dr.
        Reno, NV 89521
        8a-5p M-F | Get Map
        (775) 684-3506

        The Sparks CDL office on Greg St. is permanently closed.

        Winnemucca
        3505 Construction Way
        Winnemucca, NV 89445-3155
        8a-5p M-F | Get Map
        (775) 623-6515

        Requirements

        • Applicant must have valid Driver’s License and CDL Instruction Permit
        • Vehicle Inspection: Please bring your own pointer to identify all vehicle parts for the Vehicle Inspection.
        • Vehicle:
          • Valid Registration for vehicle/trailer,
          • Insurance (Name on registration and insurance must match)
          • **Lease or **Rental Agreement ** (Please let Department of Motor Vehicles know if vehicle is being leased or rented for full list of requirements)

          Is an attorney required to create a transfer on death deed?

          No, you do not need an attorney to create a transfer on death deed. While some states provide basic forms that can be used to create a transfer on death deed, these forms are not always up to date and are often too rigid to meet everyone’s unique needs. A better option is to use online software to create a custom transfer on death deed, tailored to your specific needs and the laws of your state. The best online estate planning software will allow you to create your transfer on death deed in a matter of minutes and have it fully customized to your wishes.


          Watch the video: Nevada (May 2022).