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Contains photographs of the sayville Railroad station - History

Contains photographs of the sayville Railroad station - History


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Sayville


Riding the Rails Up Paper Mountain

By David A. Pfeiffer

Exterior photo of Camden Station
taken in 1921.
Interior shot taken of Camden Station, B & O Railroad, Baltimore, Maryland. Records of the Interstate Commerce Commission, RG 134, Textual Reference Division.

Railroads have played an enormous role in American history, particularly in the saga of the settlement of the American West in the nineteenth century. Railroads have also played a major part in military operations and civilian supply activities during wartime. The growth of interstate commerce and mass transportation is mostly attributable to railroads. The National Archives and Records Administration (NARA) has a large volume of textual records, maps, still photographs, and motion pictures relating to railroads. Significant information about railroads is contained in more than fifty record groups comprising hundreds of series. This article highlights several examples of textual railroad records.

The American research public is slowly discovering the value of railroad records. Reference requests at NARA have been increasing over the years as more records relating to railroads have become available and as researchers have become aware of them. Many of these researchers are interested in gathering information either on a particular railroad or on a specific geographic area. The researchers include railroad buffs who are interested in the history of a railroad, model railroaders who request railroad track plans, attorneys involved in land-use litigation who need to determine title to parcels of land that were owned by a railroad, historic preservationists who are interested in construction details for railroad structures such as passenger and freight stations, genealogists interested in tracing ancestors who were railroad employees or involved in railroad accidents, and historians interested in the U.S. government's control and use of the railroads during wartime.

Railroad Valuation Records

Some of the most popular records among model railroaders, historic preservationists, railroad history buffs, and even genealogists are the railroad valuation records of the Interstate Commerce Commission (ICC). These records provide documentation pertaining to the railroads of the United States from their beginning until the 1960s. Most valuation records were created between 1915 and 1920 by the ICC and railroad engineers who undertook a massive project to inventory almost every aspect of the U.S. railroad system for the purpose of determining a net worth for each railroad. This value was then used to calculate passenger and freight rates.

The valuation records in NARA's custody total approximately eleven thousand cubic feet and are divided into two general subdivisions. Basic valuation records provide information about the railroad facilities existing at a particular location, the land owned by the railroad and how it was acquired, and the land adjacent to railroad property during the period 1915-1920. Periodic engineering updates follow changes in facilities and rolling stock held by a railroad from the period of the basic valuation to the 1960s.(1)

The valuation records generally comprise land, engineering, and accounting final reports and supporting documentation, including field notes and maps. A typical example of the valuation records are the records pertaining to the Baltimore and Ohio (B&O) Railroad's Camden Station in Baltimore, Maryland. The valuation maps, which are very popular with model railroaders, include detailed track plans for Camden Yards and the immediate vicinity. Each track map (a twenty-four-by-fifty-four-inch blueprint) covers one mile of track. The maps include the area between Camden Station and Bailey's Roundhouse at the southern end of the yard and show the location of railroad structures on the right-of-way.(2)

The engineering field notes for Camden Yards contain construction details of the station, the warehouse building, the roundhouse, and other railroad structures in the yard. The engineering notes include drawings and photographs including views of the interior and exterior of Camden Station, the train shed, the freight office, and the warehouse.(3)

The land field notes include the names of the owners and the value of the land adjacent to the railroad right-of-way around 1915. Finally, the land acquisition schedules list the landowners from whom the B&O acquired the station and yards, giving the name of the landowner, the date and cost of acquisition, type of instrument (such as lease grant, right-of-way deed or condemnation), and the parcel of land involved. The schedules are particularly useful for genealogists, provided they know the geographic location where their ancestor resided.(4)

Another series of records in the ICC railroad valuation records are the railroad inspection reports of 1939–1942. These reports include a typed summary of the ICC inspection of railroad facilities and often photographs of railroad structures and equipment. The report for the Alton Railroad contains an unusually large number of photographs.(5)

An aerial photograph from the accident report shows the aftermath of a 1961 collision between a Chicago, Rock Island, and Pacific passenger train and a motor-grader. Records of the Federal Railroad Administration, RG 399, Textual Reference Division.

Railroad Accident Reports

Railroad accident reports hold particular of interest for genealogists and railroad historians. The National Archives has custody of railroad accident reports for the period 1911–1984 in the records of the Interstate Commerce Commission and the Federal Railroad Administration.

One of several series of accident reports are the "Reports of Investigations of Railroad Accidents, 1958–1964," prepared by the ICC, in the records of the Federal Railroad Administration. In this series the accident reports are typed summaries that average ten pages in length and include photographs and track diagrams. Railroad Accident Investigation Report #3931 describes the collision of a Chicago, Rock Island, and Pacific passenger train with a motor-grader near Beech, Iowa, on November 16, 1961. This collision resulted in injuries to 110 people, including 82 passengers and the driver of the motor-grader. The crash was caused "by a motor-grader being driven onto a rail-highway grade crossing immediately in front of an approaching train."(6) The report includes a discussion of the location of accident, method of operation, description of the accident, the motor vehicle and driver, and the cause of the accident.

The largest series of records (106 cubic feet) relating to railroad accidents are the "Accident Investigation Report Files, 1969–84," in the records of the Federal Railroad Administration. These records comprise case files containing much more information than the published accident reports. Files typically include the factual accident report, copies of the railroad rules and regulations that relate to the accident, other railroad publications including timetables, statements of witnesses to the accident, railroad test and inspection data reports, railroad bulletins and notices, railroad investigation reports, and drawings and photographs of the wreckage at the accident site.(7)

A golden spike was driven at Promontory, Utah, to signal the completion of the first linkage of railroads across the American continent. NARA 16-G-99-2-1, Still Picture Branch. (View in National Archives Catalog)

Annual Reports of Railroad Companies

The annual reports submitted by railroad companies are useful to researchers interested in the history of railroads. The National Archives has custody of annual reports from 1862 to 1963 in the records of the Department of the Interior, the Commissioner of Railroads, and the Interstate Commerce Commission. The secretary of the interior was responsible for collecting annual reports from the Union Pacific, Central Pacific, Northern Pacific, Atlantic and Pacific, and the Southern Pacific railroads, companies that were receiving aid from the government between 1862 and 1878.

One prime example of an annual report is that submitted by the Union Pacific Railroad in 1869, which proclaimed the connecting of the rails of the Union Pacific and the Central Pacific Railroad on May 10, 1869, at Promontory, Utah. In his letter at the beginning of the report the president of the Union Pacific, Oliver Ames, declared that "the extraordinary efforts of these two companies in pushing forward this great trans-continental railway to completion seven years in advance of the time prescribed by law, (1876) has resulted in a very heavy increase in the cost of construction yet the rapid development of the mining and agriculture districts, consequent upon the cheap and easy transportation thus afforded, will be of great advantage to our whole country and hence more than compensate the government for the subsidies granted."(8) The report also includes lists of the names of the board of directors and the stockholders. The report of the chief engineer describing the construction of the railroad and the report of the operating department of the railroad are also prominent in the annual report. This annual report is found in the records of the Department of the Interior, Lands and Railroads Division, "Railroad Packages, 1849–1901."

The Lands and Railroads Division handled business of the Office of the Secretary of Interior concerning disposal of public lands, land grants, private land claims, and other functions as provided by the Homestead Act and other laws. The division also handled matters concerning the Pacific and land grant railroads, such as aiding the construction of railroads by federal land grants. The Railroad Packages, dating mostly from 1862 to 1881, are chiefly letters received from the President, the Commissioner of the General Land Office, and other federal officials concerning land grant and Pacific railroads. Annual reports from the land grant railroads are also included.(9)

The records of the commissioner of railroads include railroad annual reports for the period 1878 to 1904. These reports were submitted by railroads whose tracks lay west, north, or south of the Missouri River and to which the United States had granted loans, subsidies, or land.(10)

The ICC records include the annual reports of all common carriers for the period 1887 to 1963. These reports were submitted on an ICC standard form, are usually twenty to forty pages in length, and typically include the identity of the respondent, the comparative general balance sheet assets and liabilities, investment in road and equipment, income and profit and loss accounts, railway operating revenues and expenses, income and rents, employees and their compensation, important changes during the year, and description of equipment.(11)


Museums, exhibits in Suffolk County

1901 RESTORED RAILROAD DEPOT AND FREIGHT HOUSE, South Broadway and South Third Street, Irmisch Park, Lindenhurst, 631-957-7500, villageoflindenhurst.com The Freight House has collectibles about old-time Lindenhurst. Call for summer concert dates. Fee Free.

ALAN AND HELENE ROSENBERG JEWISH DISCOVERY MUSEUM, 74 Hauppauge Rd., Suffolk Y Jewish Community Center, Commack, 631-462-9800, syjcc.org Interactive displays on Jewish life, history and traditions. Also, George Kopp Jewish Military Hall of Heroes.

AMAGANSETT HISTORICAL ASSOCIATION, Montauk Highway at Windmill Lane, Amagansett, 631-267-3020, amagansetthistory.org Hours 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Fri.-Sun. July 5-Sept. 1. The 1725 Miss Amelia Cottage Museum houses exhibits from Colonial times to early 20th century. Fee$5, free younger than 12.

ANNIE COOPER BOYD HOUSE, 174 Main St., Sag Harbor, 631-725-5092, sagharborhistoricalsociety.org Hours 1-4 p.m. Sat.-Sun. Memorial Day-Columbus Day other times, by appointment. Research library hours 9 a.m.-noon Mon.-Wed. all year or by appointment. The 1700s house has paintings by Annie Cooper Boyd. Fee Free, donations.

BAY SHORE HISTORICAL SOCIETY GIBSON-MACK-HOLT HOUSE C. 1820, 22 Maple Ave., Bay Shore, 631-665-1707, bayshorehistoricalsociety.org Hours 1-4 p.m. Tue. and Sat. group tours by appointment. The 1820 Victorian with 1850s furnishings features a kitchen with a cast-iron stove and coal hot water heater and ice box. Outdoors, find a chicken coop, outhouse, Victorian herb garden and grape arbor. Historical photos, Bay Shore memorabilia and movie posters on display. Reference library available for research. Society programs at 7 p.m. the third Thur. of every month (except July and Dec.) at Bay Shore-Brightwaters Library. Fee Free.

BAYPORT AERODROME SOCIETY’S LIVING AVIATION MUSEUM, Vitamin Drive, off Church Street, Bayport, bayportaerodromesociety.org Hours 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Sun. April-Nov., or by appointment. A 24-hangar complex with antique and experimental aircraft two hangars with exhibits on aviation history. Fee Free.

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BELLPORT-BROOKHAVEN HISTORICAL SOCIETY, 31 Bellport Lane, Bellport, bbhsmuseum.com, 631-286- 0888, group tours by appointment. Includes Post-Crowell House Museum, The Barn Museum (household items from the 1700s, toys, decoy and shore bird collections, tinware) Brown Building (Post-Morrow collection of antique paperweights) Milk House Blacksmith Shop John Chester Boat House (catboat, scooter, boating equipment) exchange shop at 12 Bell Street, Bellport. Summer Exhibit: “An Artists Place,” June 2-July 28, at the Brown Building.

THE BIG DUCK, 1012 Flanders Rd. (Route 24), Flanders, 631-852-3377, bigduck.org Hours 10 a.m.-5 p.m. daily, but call ahead. Built in 1931, the Big Duck was where the Martin and Jeule Maurer family sold their Peking ducks on Riverhead’s West Main Street. In 1936, the Maurers moved the building to Route 24 in Flanders. Roadside architecture that represents the goods sold in the building is now known as “duck architecture.” Duck-farming exhibit in the adjacent Victorian Barn weekends during summer. Fee Free

BOHEMIA HISTORICAL SOCIETY, 1519 Locust Ave., Bohemia, bohemiahistoricalsocietyny.org, 631-567-1095 Hours By appointment. Kitchen, living room, two bedrooms with period furniture, and Czech folk art. Meetings, with guest speaker, at 7 p.m. the first Thur. April-May, Sept.-Dec. at the museum. Fee Donations.

BRIDGEHAMPTON MUSEUM, 2368 Montauk Hwy. and Corwith Avenue, Bridgehampton, 631-537-1088 archives: bhmuseum.org, 631-613-6730. Hours 10 a.m.-3 p.m. Mon.-Fri. all-year, plus 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Sat. June-Oct. and by appointment. Corwith House (1800s) features rotating exhibits. Call for a time to see 1870s wheelwright- blacksmith shop and 1907 jailhouse. Fee $5.

BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY, William Floyd Parkway, Upton, 631-344-2651, bnl.gov. Hours Summer Sundays 10 a.m.-3 p.m. July 14, 21, 28 and Aug. 4 offer family-friendly science shows. Activities and tours take visitors into different research facilities each week. FeeFree. Visitors 16 and older must bring a photo ID.

BROOKHAVEN TOWN VOLUNTEER FIREFIGHTERS MUSEUM, Fireman’s Memorial Park, Route 25 (Middle Country Road), Ridge, 631-924-8114, brookhavenfiremuseum.org HoursTours by appointment. Restored 1889 Center Moriches firehouse with memorabilia and 10 pieces of equipment. A second house has nine trucks and a tiller ladder. Fee Donations.

CHILDREN’S MUSEUM OF THE EAST END, 376 Bridgehampton-Sag Harbor Tpke., Bridgehampton, 631-537-8250, cmee.org Hours 9 a.m.-5 p.m. daily except Tue. (closed) until June 25, then open daily through Labor Day. Learn about wind science to firefighting, farming to fishing family concerts.

COLD SPRING HARBOR LABORATORY DNA LEARNING CENTER, 334 Main St., Cold Spring Harbor, 516-367-5170, dnalc.org Hours 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Mon.-Fri. A free, self-guided exhibit offers insight into the study of DNA and human origins. Check the website for science programs, guided Ötzi the Iceman tours, and summer science camps. Fee Varies

COLONIAL ARSENAL MUSEUM, 425 Park Ave., Huntington, 631-427-7045 Hours Tours by appointment. Dutch construction, circa 1740, built by Joseph Wickes. It was enlarged and sold to Job Sammis, a Colonial weaver it also served as an arsenal for the Suffolk County Militia (1775-76). Fee Donations.

CORWITH WINDMILL, VILLAGE GREEN, 695 Montauk Hwy., Water Mill, 631-283-0527 Hours Tours of the mill, once used for grinding grain, by appointment. Built in Sag Harbor in 1800, moved in 1813, operated until 1887. Fee Donations.

CUSTER INSTITUTE AND OBSERVATORY, 1115 Main Bayview Rd., off Route 25, Southold, 631-765-2626, custerobservatory.org Hours Dusk-midnight Sat. call ahead for group tours. High-powered telescopes, portable planetarium shows, lectures, classes, concerts and art exhibits. Fee Suggested donation $5, $3 younger than 14.

CUSTOM HOUSE, Main and Garden streets, Sag Harbor, preservationlongisland.org/custom-house, 631-692-4664 (Mon.-Fri. only) Hours 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Sat.-Sun. Memorial Day-June 10 a.m.-5 p.m. daily July-Aug., 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Sat.-Sun. Sept.-Columbus Day. Groups by appointment. The 18th century home of the port’s first customs master, Henry Packer Dering. Formal dining room, office, children’s room, kitchen, pantry and laundry. Fee $6, $5 seniors, $3 ages 7-14.

CUTCHOGUE VILLAGE GREEN HISTORIC BUILDINGS, 27320 Rte. 25 (Main Road), Cutchogue, cutchoguenewsuffolkhistory.org 631-734-7122. Hours House tours 1-4 p.m. Sat.-Mon., June 29- Oct. 6, and special events. The Old House, a 17th century First Period house, is one of the most significant English-style frame houses in the state. Furnishings reflect the lifestyle of a wealthy prominent founding family. Nearby, the pre-Revolutionary Wickham Farmhouse features household artifacts of the 18th and 19th centuries. An 1840 one-room Old Schoolhouse displays Native American relics from local collections. The Village Garage exhibits the “Evolution of Transportation,” including a 1926 Model T Ford truck. The Old Red Barnhouses a collection of 19th century farm and woodworking tools. A pre-Civil War Carriage House serves as a gift shop and information center. Fee Donation.

EAST END SEAPORT MUSEUM, Third Street at Ferry Dock, Greenport, eastendseaport.org, 631-477-2100 Hours 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Sat.-Sun. May-June 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Wed.-Mon. (closed Tue.) July-Labor Day 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Fri.-Sun. Sept.-Oct. by appointment Nov.-April. 750-gallon saltwater aquarium two Fresnel lenses gift shop exhibits. Weekly lighthouse cruises and tours May-Oct. Reservations recommended. Events: Land & Sea Gala, Sept. 20 29th Annual East End Maritime Festival, Sept. 21-22. Fee Free admission to museum, donations accepted

EAST HAMPTON HISTORICAL SOCIETY, 101 Main St., East Hampton, easthamptonhistory.org, 631-324-6850 Hours Osborn-Jackson House Museum open 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Mon.-Fri. The historical society is the parent organization of 7 museums, national landmark historic sites. The Mulford Farm Museum, 10 James Lane, is considered one of America’s most significant, intact English Colonial farmsteads. Clinton Academy Museum, 151 Main St., preserves the architecture of the state’s first chartered secondary school (circa 1784) and offers revolving fine art exhibits as well as decorative and folk arts from the society’s collections. Town House Museum, 149 Main St., is an early town government meeting place once used as a school. The Hook Schoolhouse, 149 Main St., a one-room, 18th century schoolhouse. The Osborn-Jackson House Museum, 101 Main St., circa 1720, is the society’s headquarters. East Hampton Town Marine Museum, 301 Bluff Rd., Amagansett, tells the story of Long Island’s East End and its relationship with the sea through artifacts, photographs, models and displays. The Claus Hoie Gallery of Whaling, depicts a 19th century Sag Harbor voyage as described in a whaling log. The Thomas & Mary Nimmo Moran Studio, an 1884 studio cottage, marked the beginning of the village as an artist’s colony.

EASTVILLE HERITAGE HOUSE, 139 Hampton St., Sag Harbor, eastvillehistorical.org, 631-725-4711. Hours 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Wed. all year. Call for appointment. One-story, restored Sears-Roebuck mail-order house with letters, journals, photos, furniture and artifacts dating from the 1800s. The house was purchased through a catalog in 1925 by Lippman Johnson, an African-American entrepreneur, and his wife, Rose. Tours available of the home, St. David AME Zion Cemetery and surrounding community. Fee $10, $5 children.

GARDINER MILL COTTAGE, 36 James Lane, East Hampton, 631-324-0713, easthamptonvillage.org Hours Noon-4 p.m. Sat.-Sun., June-Sept. Features 19th Century landscape paintings of Eastern Long Island. Visitors may also visit the 1804 Gardiner Mill. FeeFree

GREATER PATCHOGUE HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM, 160 W. Main Street, Patchogue, 631-654-1712, greaterpatchoguehistoricalsociety.com Hours Noon-3 p.m. Fri.-Sat. Housed at the lower level of Patchogue’s Carnegie Library, the museum features historical artifacts, displays, and photographs pertaining to the history of the greater Patchogue area. Fee Free.

GUILD HALL MUSEUM, 158 Main St., East Hampton, 631-324-0806, guildhall.org Hours 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Fri.-Sat., Mon., noon-5 p.m. Sun. through July 4 noon-5 p.m. daily July 4-Labor Day. Museum Mondays at Guild Hall, noon-1 p.m. Golf Outing June 13, Maidstone Club Tony Oursler Exhibition June 8-July 21 Clothesline Art Sale July 27 Ugo Rondinone Sunny Days Exhibition Aug. 10-Oct. 14. Fee Free for museum exhibits.

HALLOCKVILLE MUSEUM FARM, 6038 Sound Ave., Riverhead, 631-298-5292, hallockville.com Hours Vary. This 28-acre historic farm site represents rural life on the North Fork from the 1760s to 1930s and is surrounded by more than 500 acres of preserved land. 16th Annual Hallockville Barn Dance July 27. 39th Country Fair and Craft Show Aug. 24-25.Fee Varies.

HECKSCHER MUSEUM OF ART, 2 Prime Ave. at Route 25A, Huntington, 631-351-3250, heckscher.org Hours 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Wed.-Fri., 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Sat.-Sun. Exhibitions: “In a New Light: American Impressionism 1870-1940” through Aug. 18 “Mort Kϋnstler: The ‘Godfather‘ of Illustrated Pulp Fiction” and “A Brush with HerStory: Paintings by Gabriela Gonzalez Dellosso,” opens Aug. 24. “A Fine Line: Sketches, Drawings and Illustrations from the Collection” opens Aug. 31. Events: Art in Bloom, June 8-9. DRAW OUT! Arts Festival, Sept. 22, rain date: Sept. 28. Fee $8, $6 seniors, $5 students, free younger than 10.

HOME SWEET HOME, 14 James Lane, East Hampton, 631-324-0713, easthamptonvillage.org Hours 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Mon.-Sat., 2-4 p.m. Sun. May-Sept. weekends only Oct.-Nov. This 18th century saltbox house contains artifacts relating to the life of John Howard Payne, who wrote the lyrics to the song “Home Sweet Home.” It displays antique furniture, Lusterware and other ceramics. Guided tours available. Pantigo Windmill (1804) and historical gardens on property. Fee $4, $2 ages 12 and younger.

HUNTINGTON HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUMS, 209 Main St., Huntington, 631-427-7045, huntingtonhistoricalsociety.org Hours Historical Society Sewing & Trade School, 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Mon-Fri. Research Center, 1-4 p.m. Mon., call ahead Kissam House, by appointment Conklin House, 1-4 p.m. Fri. and Sun Soldiers and Sailors Memorial Building, 1-4 p.m. Wed-Fri. Conklin Farm House Museum, circa 1750, 2 High St. (at New York Avenue). Period rooms with 18th and 19th century furnishings, table and chair used by George Washington during his 1790 Long Island tour. The 1795 Kissam House Museum, 434 Park Ave., is noted for Egyptian Revival woodwork. Antiques & Collectibles Shop on Kissam grounds open 1-4 p.m. Tue.-Wed., Fri.-Sun.Soldiers and Sailors Memorial Building, 228 Main St.. Fee Sewing and Trade School, $5 Kissam House, $5 Conklin House, $5, $3 seniors and students. Soldiers and Sailors Memorial Building, free.

ISLIP ART MUSEUM, 50 Irish Lane, East Islip, 631-224-5402, islipartmuseum.org or 631-224-5420 Hours 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Tue.-Fri, noon-4 p.m. Sat., closed Sun.-Mon. Housed in historic Brookwood Hall, the museum specializes in avant-garde art, with about five exhibits a year, plus a permanent collection. Exhibits: Prime Time, April 15-June 15, featuring artists from the permanent collection and others in their Golden Years IAM Open Call: The Art of Collaboration, June 30-Aug. 30 A Book About Death: The 10th Anniversary Edition, Sept. 14-Nov. 2. Events: Antiques and Collectibles Fair with free appraisals, June 16. Fee Suggested: $5

JOHN SCUDDER AND MARY PELLETREAU HAVENS HOMESTEAD, 15 E. Main St., Center Moriches, 631-461-6271, havenshomestead.org Hours Museum shop 1-5 p.m. Fri., 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Sat., noon-4 p.m. Sun. Tours of house museum by appointment. Moriches Bay Historical Society maintains John Scudder Havens Homestead (circa 1755) Dutch Colonial with circa-1898 addition and circa-1920 Emery Tuttle duck farm barn, local memorabilia. Visit 260-acre Terrell River County Park Preserve, Havens Estate, across the street. Fee Tours, $12, $5 children.

JOSEPH LLOYD MANOR, 1 Lloyd Lane and Lloyd Harbor Road, preservationlongisland.org, 631-692-4664. Hours 1-5 p.m. weekends Memorial Day-Columbus Day, groups by appointment. Built in 1766, the manor overlooks Lloyd Harbor. Jupiter Hammon, America’s first published black poet, lived here as a slave. Fee $5, $3 ages 7-14 and seniors.

KETCHAM INN, 81 Main St., Center Moriches, 631-878-1855, ketchaminn.org Hours Tours by appointment book barn open 1-5 p.m. Mon., Thur.-Fri. and 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Sat.-Sun. Also, a circa-1898 teepee associated with Unkechaug Indians Ketcham Farm Book Barn, a restored timber-frame barn accepts antique, rare and like-new books for resale to support restoration. The Havens Ketcham Cultural Visitor Center across the street opens midsummer for art, theater and literature events. Fee Tours $18, $10 for children, tickets sold through Eventbrite.

LAKE RONKONKOMA HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM, 328 Hawkins Ave., Lake Ronkonkoma, 631-467-3152, lakerhs.org Hours 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Sat. and by appointment. The Ronkonkoma Library building opened in 1916 and now houses the museum, with more than 1,000 arrowheads, Indian weapons and tools. Memorabilia of Broadway actress Maude Adams is on display. The society also maintains the Fitz-Greene Hallock Homestead Museum, circa 1888, with 14 rooms, including 11 bedrooms tours by appointment. Fee Free.

LAUDER MUSEUM, 170 Broadway, Amityville, 631-598-1486, amityvillehistoricalsociety.net Hours 2-4 p.m. Sun., Tue., Fri., research library, tours by appointment. Exhibits feature an 1880s Victorian parlor, kitchens, the impact of Great South Bay, decoys, early photos and models of local buildings. A diorama of Frank Buck’s Zoo, which operated in Massapequa from the 1930s to 1960s, is on permanent display. Fee Free.

LEIBER COLLECTION MUSEUM, 446 Old Stone Hwy., East Hampton, 631-329-3288, leibermuseum.org Hours 1-4 p.m. Sat.-Sun. and Wed. Memorial Day-Labor Day or year-round by appointment. Gallery and museum feature more than 500 Judith Leiber handbags as well as paintings by Gerson Leiber. Fee Free.

LEO P. OSTEBO KINGS PARK HERITAGE MUSEUM, 99 Old Dock Rd., in the RJO building. Weekend, event and summer entrance 101 Church St., Kings Park, 631-269-3305, kpheritagemuseum.net Hours 10:30 a.m.-3 p.m. Mon.-Sat. Tours by appointment. Ten rooms filled with artifacts, including historic photos of local families and the town (1800s-today) collections include Ford Model A and Model T, 1931 Plymouth, 1955 Plymouth autos, local and military artifacts. Fee Free.

LONG ISLAND AQUARIUM, 431 E. Main St., Riverhead, 631-208-9200, longislandaquarium.com. Features a wide range of exhibits that bring undersea wonders to life. The more than 100 exhibits include the legendary Lost City of Atlantis, living coral and the ecosystem along the Peconic River. Hours 10 a.m.-5 p.m. daily except Thanksgiving, Christmas. Fee $29.50 ages 13-61, $25.50 seniors 62 and older, $22.50 ages 3-12.

LONG ISLAND EXPLORIUM, 101 E. Broadway, Port Jefferson, 631-331-3277, longislandexplorium.org Hours 1-5 p.m. Sat.-Sun. and most school holidays summer Hours 1-5 p.m. Wed.-Sun. Visitors discover the wonders of STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math). Offers hands-on exhibits and programs for children and families, weekly STEM challenges, Maker Spotlight programs, summer camps, and birthday parties. Fee $5, free younger than 1.

LONG ISLAND MARITIME MUSEUM, 88 West Ave., West Sayville, 631-854-4974, limaritime.org Hours 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Mon.-Tue. and Thur.-Sat., noon- 4 p.m. Sun., closed Wed. Focus is on Long Island’s maritime history. Exhibits include historic wooden boats, sailboats, an oyster culling house and bayman’s cottage. Museum is home to the oyster sloop Priscilla.Festival Aug. 24-25. Fee $8, $6 seniors and children group tours available.

LONG ISLAND SCIENCE CENTER, 40 Peconic Ave. Riverhead, 631-208-8000, sciencecenterli.org Hours: 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Wed.-Fri., 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Sat.-Sun. 11 a.m.-4 p.m. during school vacations Summer: noon-5 p.m. Wed.-Fri. and 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Sat.-Sun. Hands-on science and technology museum with interactive exhibits. Fee $10, free 2 and younger.

LONGWOOD ESTATE, Longwood and Smith roads, Ridge, 631-924-1820, brookhaven.org Hours 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Mon.-Fri. all year. A Town of Brookhaven historic park, circa 1790, 35 acres, manor house, one-room school house and barns. Ongoing educational programs for all ages. FeeFree, fee for some activities.

LYZON HAT SHOP MUSEUM, 116 W. Montauk Hwy., Hampton Bays, 631-728-0887, hbhps.org Hours 11 a.m.-2 p.m. Sat., May 25-Sept. 28 and by appointment. Exhibits feature about 70 original handmade hats Walter King fashioned for socialites from near and far until the shop closed. Also included will be some of the original decorative Lyzon hat boxes, a wood form King used to make hats and some of the original brand labels. Summer: 1939 New York World’s Fair Exhibit in conjunction with the World’s Fair Historical Society located on the first floor. FeeDonations appreciated

MANORVILLE HISTORICAL SOCIETY, 50 North St., Manorville, 631-878-1579 Hours Thrift store and schoolhouse open first Sat. of each month and by appointment. 1929 two-room schoolhouse is furnished with period artifacts. Fee Free.


Approximate boat location: Sayville, New York

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[edit] Historical preservation of stations [ edit | edit source ]

Five LIRR stations are listed on the National Register of Historic Places: Sea Cliff, Oyster Bay, Farmingdale, Greenport and East Hampton. Southampton Station is a contributing property to a historic district on the NRHP. Other stations that aren't on the list are often cherished by local communities and treated as landmarks, such as Islip, Northport, Glen Street, and Great Neck. Roslyn, Glen Cove, and Locust Valley are other stations on the Oyster Bay Branch that are historic. Efforts to save the original East Williston station house in 2004 proved to be disappointing when the structure was found to be too unstable, while the demolition of Amagansett's in 1965 brought public outcry throughout the Hamptons as well as among local railfans that has lasted for decades.

The St. James station house, built in 1873, is the oldest such building constructed by the LIRR that remains standing. Hewlett's station house is older, but it was originally built by the South Side Railroad of Long Island in 1870. On the West Hempstead Branch, Malverne's station house is the only one originally built during the first two decades of the 20th Century, although it is not recognized an a historic landmark. The elaborate Forest Hills station house was one of the few to avoid modernization during the mid-to-late 20th Century and has retained the original grand decorative construction. When the Babylon Branch was elevated in the post-WW II era, former station houses in Wantagh and Lindenhurst were moved away from the tracks. The former Wantagh station was transfromed into a museum, and also listed on the NRHP.


The publication of the United States Chamber of Commerce. All issues from 1914 to 1999 have been digitized.

Organized in Ohio in 1895 with the goal to protect American goods from foreign competition and to promote trade expansion, the National Association of Manufacturers (NAM) continues today as the largest manufacturing association in the United States. This digital collection contains a selection of images primarily dating to the 1960s and 1970s. The collection has not been digitized in its entirety. Read more about the collection on the NAM Project News site.


THINK LONG ISLAND FIRST

Last Sunday, I met with photographer Alan Henriksen at the Planting Fields Arboretum for a working photo shoot session. Alan took a series of photos of plants pushing against the stained and whitewashed glass of the main greenhouse. Most visitors go inside the greenhouse and photograph objects within it takes a photographer's eye to see a potential for great photos from the outside looking in.

We have here a short video of Alan taking the first shots of the session, a warm-up as he called it.


Photo by Alan Henriksen
The image on the right is the first photo taken in the video. You can see stains on the glass and plants inside of the greenhouse. The overall effect resembles an underwater photograph. I guess, this is not how you have envisioned the end result of the take. It was a surprise to me, too. Made me look again and think. And admire.

The combination of natural and man made objects, frequently photographed through windows, are a recurring theme in Alan's latest work. The objects and the reflections in the glass give an interesting sense of space. Check out Alan's website www.alanhenriksen.com to see his portfolio of varied themes, subjects, and locations. The Sunday photos will be making their way there shortly. Alan is also considering submitting them to a photo competition.

Becoming a photographer, Alan's way


Forest Reflections
Acadia, Maine, 2010
Photo by Alan Henriksen

Alan Henriksen, a Long Island native, comes from a seafaring stock. His grandfather, Henrik, still holds the world record for Atlantic salmon. Alan's father, Hans, who served as an engineer in the Norwegian navy during World War II, was also an expert fisherman. He married and started a family in the US following WWII. Alan grew up exposed to Long Island's forests and its surrounding sea. His family's homes in Massapequa Park and, later on, Oakdale were adjacent to large nature preserves, which he explored extensively. The family also went on frequent fishing trips, either in the family boat or on occasional outings to Montauk, where they would practice surf fishing in the afternoon and evening, camp overnight on the beach, and continue fishing the following morning. These experiences, on land and water, became a great inspiration for his work.

Alan began photographing in 1958, at the age of nine, with a Kodak Brownie camera. In 1959 he received a small darkroom kit as a Christmas present. The kit included a package of print-out paper, which produced a visible image upon exposure to sunlight, and the trays and chemicals to tone the print and make it permanent.

During his high school years a review of a book of Civil War photographs led Alan to the Sayville Library, where he wandered into the photography section and chanced upon "The Picture History of Photography" by Peter Pollack Edward Weston's pepper was the first photograph he saw. That moment was an epiphany - Alan decided that photography was the path he would follow. Using savings from his newspaper delivery job, Alan bought his neighbor's camera and darkroom equipment. Later, as editor of the high school yearbook and vice-president of the school's camera club, he had access to a well-equipped darkroom, where he spent many hours improving his printing skills.

In 1966, at age 17, one of Alan's photographs, of a clump of pokeberries against a tree stump, was accepted into the Northwest International Exhibition in Washington state.


Mirror Lake
Yosemite, 1970
Photo by Alan Henriksen

The following year Alan began a correspondence with Ansel Adams, who became his mentor. In 1970, after three years of phone conversations and mail exchanges with Adams, Alan attended the Ansel Adams Yosemite Workshop, where he met Adams in person. Many years later, one of Alan's photos from this trip was accepted into the Yosemite Renaissance Exhibition, which toured California, starting at the Yosemite National Park Museum.

From 1974 to 1983 Alan was employed at Agfa-Gevaert's photo paper manufacturing plant in Shoreham, Long Island. He worked primarily as a sensitometrist, someone who is expert in determining the way in which photographic paper responds to light. This led to Alan's collaboration in the late 70's with Adams, along with photographers David Vestal and Paul Caponigro, on Popular Photography Magazine's project to develop better photo paper. In the late 80's Alan put his knowledge of sensitometry to use by authoring ZoneCalc, a software implementation of Ansel Adams' Zone System of exposure and development, which was marketed by Maine Photographic Resource.

Fast forward some years and technological advances. Though fully equipped to photograph and print using multiple film-based formats, Alan now photographs mostly with a digital camera, and has extended his output to include not only black and white, but also color.




Windows
Bar Harbor, Maine 2008
Photo by Alan Henriksen
Boards and Tarp
Searsport, Maine 2010
Photo by Alan Henriksen
Doors and Reflections
Bar Harbor, Maine 2008
Photo by Alan Henriksen

In addition to the portfolio, Alan's website, www.alanhenriksen.com, also contains a list of the exhibits and publications. His work has received recognition from major photography magazines and has found its place in serious private collections.

Make sure you read Dean Brierly's excellent interview Alan Henriksen: Contrapuntal Vision.


Contents

March 10, 2017 Jamaica, Northeastern Brooklyn and the Brooklyn Snow Edit

Since a trusted Wikipedia photographer got the wrong building by mistake.

.. I thought I'd get a shot or two of the J. Kurtz and Sons Store Building in Jamaica before hitting the J train.

First image towards the lower level of the Jamaica Center Terminal

And the first image of the lower level, where the sign for the J and Z trains claim it's a skip stop.

Station name sign along the Broad and Wall Street-bound tracks

Sign for York College. That R32 was leaking at the time.

And here's an elevator back up. I didn't take it.

My first attempt to expand the gallery for Sutter Avenue (BMT Canarsie Line) station.

View of the platform for Lower Manhattan-bound trains.

A Canarsie - Rockaway Parkway-bound train is about to stop here.

The train is an R143 dropping off and picking up passengers.

.. and just before it leaves.

A "No Exit" sign on the Canarsie-bound platform.

Sign for Rockaway Parkway-bound trains.

.. and a second view, which didn't come out as dark.

Here's an exit, and a sign for that exit from the platform.

And an Automatic Train Operation warning sign.

Plenty of snow that March. This was before Winter Storm Stella.

The narrow staircases along the tracks provide views you don't get too often.

They also change direction before approaching the station houses.

The steps over part of the right-of-way of the LIRR Bay Ridge Branch, with a shed behind the station house.

The steps over southbound Van Sinderen Avenue north of Sutter Avenue.

Eye-level views of the tracks from the staircases are your reward for using this station.

Even just above the tracks you're close enough for a decent view.

Braille sign on the Lower Manhattan-bound platform.

View of the Canarsie-bound platform from there, and if you zoom in, you can see the sign telling commuters that it's for the "14th Street Local" to 8th Avenue in Manhattan.

Back to the crossunder, where this sign gives you a choice of each platform.

Shot of the LIRR Bay Ridge Branch, and Sutter Avenue itself over those tracks.

And a return to the Rockaway Parkway-bound platform for this braille sign.

Finally, I got the staircase along Van Sinderen Avenue under the New Lots Avenue (BMT Canarsie Line) that I missed the chance to get in 2015.

My second attempt to expand the gallery for East 105th Street (BMT Canarsie Line) station.

One sign over the platform for the last stop at Rockaway Parkway. You can't go anywhere else from there.

The opposite side of this sign is for Lower Manhattan, where you have more stops in between.

I grabbed a view from up the staircase, so I thought it'd be a good idea to get another one down.

Never knew about this freight line before. It turns out this is a long spur from the Bay Ridge Branch, that's barely used anymore.

A sign at the bottom of the staircase.

.. which was at my intended goal for this station.

.. the pedestrian walkway that used to be the other side of East 105th Street before they closed the grade crossing.

That dead end bumper along the Lower Manhattan-bound track is a layup track for the Canarsie Yard, just south of here.

Brialle sign for 2 and 3 trains to Manhattan and the Bronx.

.. and another to Flatbush and New Lots.

Mosaic along one of the walls, which also includes the name of the neighborhood.

Exit sign above the Clark Street Passageway leading to the two entrances within the Hotel Saint George.

First image from the Hotel St. George station entrance, which was my ultimate goal. Three elevators down only.

Braille sign and a yellow staircase man sign at the Clark Street Entrance, even though there are no staircases from the street to the subway turnstiles.

The Clark Street Entrance also includes a CitiBike depot.

Around the corner the Henry Street Entrance has a standard MTA Helvetica sign at the doorway, just like the Clark Street Entrance does.

It also has many of the old signs that used to be attached to the hotel entrance.

Shot of the Henry Street Entrance from across the street.

An old fashioned mailbox inside the Henry Street entrance. I should've taken some pics above the door and see if the MTA has a sign that says "Henry Street."

Last image at Clark Street Station for the "Ray Ring Clark Street Passage," who's name I read later was actually ROY Ring.

Since there was no pic of the NRHP listed PS 7 in DUMBO.

.. I thought I'd go after this one after getting out of the York Street Subway Station.

In the meantime, I spotted this 1970 Chevrolet Impala at the playground of Farragut Houses

The owner of that grocery store across the street told me it was owned by an 83 year old woman.

With those bumper guards, some might think this was an ex-Taxicab. Actually most taxis of the '70's had bigger bumper guards than this.

My intended target in Dumbo was actually this ventilation tower.

What's so special about this tower, you ask?

Well, it's not these freight doors.

It also serves as the entrance to York Street (IND Sixth Avenue Line) station on Jay Street.

Same entrance from another angle. I also wanted the braille sign and a yellow staircase man sign at that entrance, but it came out too blurry.

My first attempt to expand the gallery of Avenue H (BMT Brighton Line).

.. specifically the modern southbound headhouse, as opposed to the historic northbound one.

This view is from the middle of the dead end of Avenue H on the west side of the tracks.

A standard "End" sign which can be found at many Dead End Streets in New York City, with a small green parkland.

Right next to this dead end is a pedestrian tunnel to the other side of the tracks.

Since there are already enough images of the historic northbound station house, I thought I'd go back and snap some of the southbound station house. This is from the handicapped ramps behind the station house.

That's the other side of the turnstiles shown here.

However, since I had to go back towards Queens after this.

.. I decided I'd take some shots of the southbound platform from the northbound platform before I left.

A Coney Island-bound R160 of some kind (R160A or R160B) stops at the station.

My first attempt to expand the gallery of the Van Siclen Avenue (IND Fulton Street Line)

The sign says the station can handle 10-car trains.

An old-fashioned IND pillar sign between the tracks

A bench near one of the mosaics.

Sign at the station, while an A train flies by. I'm lucky I captured this before my camera battery died.

Used my cell phone for this braille sign for C trains to Euclid Avenue.

.. and this other one across the tracks for 168th Street in Washington Heights. I'm really sorry I didn't get to take pics of Van Siclen Avenue (BMT Jamaica Line).

It's weird, but when I got back to Broadway Junction, I left on a Z train.

.. but somehow when I arrived at Jamaica Center (as in this and the previous image), it became a K train.

March 11, 2017 Reconquest of the Harlem Line in Central Westchester Edit

After years of trying, I finally got a shot of Bell Plaza in Bayside.

.. this close-up shot was supposed to be better.

I also tried to get the old Bayside LIRR station freight house from the Bell Boulevard bridge, but I got it from the wrong spot.

On the way up the Harlem Line, I was lucky enough to capture the southbound on-ramp from Exit 10 on the Bronx River Parkway south of Woodlawn (Metro-North station), from the Harlem Line itself.

First image in my second attempt to expand Hawthorne (Metro-North station)

The former station house, originally owned by New York Central Railroad, now the "Station Café and Grille."

Looking south at a sign pointing out tracks 1 and 2 to commuters, with the NY 141 bridge in the background.

A larger, but standard station name sign along the platform

Almost at the south end of the platform and closer to the NY 141 bridge.

Facing north, where the same signs are encountered in the opposite direction.

Looking north at a sign pointing out tracks 2 and 1 to commuters, with a Coca-Cola vending machine, an enclosed shelter, and the pedestrian bridge in the background.

As it turns out, the heat buttons in Metro-North's enclosed shelters are more common than I thought.

The Southeast and Wassaic-bound tracks go under the pedestrian bridge on the right.

.. and the White Plains and Grand Central-bound tracks go under the pedestrian bridge on the left. The staircase to that bridge can also be seen.

Across from the top of that staircase is an elevator to the platform.

Off to the right is another elevator to the parking lot along NY 141.

View from the walkway between the dead end at Broadway and the pedestrian bridge. This was one of the few full views of MTA's station sign that I could get.

Another sign telling commuters that on-board ticket purchases cost more.

Broadway used to cross the tracks and join Elwood Avenue (NY 141).

The walkway from the dead end at Broadway to the staircase of the pedestrian bridge.

A Grand Central-bound M7 stopped at the station briefly. NY 141 is on the east side of the Wassaic-bound tracks and turns northeast shortly after passing the station.

Close-up shot the station sign previously seen from the Broadway Pedestrian Bridge walkway.

.. the same sign at a slightly different angle.

Looking south again at the Southeast and Wassaic-bound tracks go under the pedestrian bridge on the left.

.. and the White Plains and Grand Central-bound tracks go under the pedestrian bridge on the right. The staircase on the right of the tracks is actually from Broadway.

Another shot of the former NYC station house.

Same station house at a slightly different angle.

First image in my second attempt to expand Katonah (Metro-North station)

Behind the elevator shaft along the platform

The elevator itself from the platform.

Staircase along the Lakeside Road parking lot. At one time, there was also a ramp to the station from the southbound on-ramp to I-684-NY 117-SMP.

A more modern MTA information board. It's always good to know when the next train is coming your way.

Another shot walking down the platform turned towards the Wassaic-bound tracks.

.. and then towards the New York City-bound tracks, almost at the end north of the crossing with Jay Street (former NY 35).

From the end of this platform, you can also see the old New York Central Railroad station across Jay Street.

Looking again at the Southeast and Wassaic-bound tracks going under the pedestrian bridge on the right.

.. and the White Plains and Grand Central-bound tracks go under the pedestrian bridge on the left.

The staircase to that bridge can also be seen.

Staircase to the pedestrian bridge leading to Katonah Avenue on the west side and the Lakeside Road parking lot on the east side.

The elevator to the platform from the pedestrian bridge, across from the top of the stairs.

Staircase to the platform from Katonah Avenue.

Next to that staircase is a local community bulletin board.

.. and in between are a pair of public mailboxes. one for letters and the other, and old-fashioned one for "Relay Mail."

One the other side of this staircase is a bicycle rack.

The other elevator to the Lakeside Road Parking Lot.

.. further back for a better view of the sign above the elevator.

Looking north from the pedestrian bridge towards Wassaic.

.. and south towards Grand Central Terminal.

Staircase to the platform from Lakeside Road.

. where you'll find a bike rack, some benches, a parking pay station sign, a stone wall.

.. and on this day, a little bit of leftover snow.

Across the Jay Street crossing at a dirt parking lot for a nature preserve, you can see the former NYC station.

On the other side of the tracks, you see an Italian restaurant in the former NYC station

Other stores exist here besides Katonah Wine & Liquors, FYI.

And I thought I'd get a shot of the other side, just because nobody has covered it so far.

The Blue Dolphin Diner in Katonah. I thought I should capture this thing.

The Kelloggs and Lawrence Hardware Store, which is also used as a local visitor's information center.

The same hardware store across Jay Street. I should've taken one of the pizzeria across the street.

Another attempt to capture pics at the legendary Grand Central Terminal Biltmore Room.

In the meantime the Post Office building behind Grand Central Terminal needed some new pictures.

Like many big post offices, they rent and lease space to other companies.

The address is for 450 Lexington Avenue, though the image is from East 45th Street

The lobby on East 45th Street

The Post Office rents out space to other businesses, like FedEx.

The FedEx within the post office at another angle. They also have a Starbucks on Lexington Avenue.

An enclosed corridor on East 45th Street running along Lexington Avenue.

Revolving door along Lexington Avenue

Another shot of the "450" Lexington Avenue inscription.

.. but this time it's from Lexington Avenue, just like this US Post Office inscription.

Doorway to the Lexington Avenue lobby.

Close-up of the services at the post office. Remember, this goes back to the time when the post office worked with the railroads.

Original mail slots with some updated stickers and old-looking signs.

Old-fashioned post boxes still exist here.

Old looking sign above the mail slots for letters with stamps, although this may not be a replica.

Old-looking sign above the mail slots for letters with meter strips, and the modern stickers

Old-looking sign above the mail slot meter strips without the modern stickers.

As you can see, the ZIP Code is 10017-9998

This door looks like it's for the post office staff only.

March 12, 2017 Edit

My first attempt to expand the gallery at Mamaroneck (Metro-North station).

I was lucky this was Sunday, because I had free parking.

Sign and staircase to the New Haven-bound platform

Looking towards State Street in New Haven itself. or New Haven Union Station if you want one last chance to catch an Amtrak train to Boston.

The same New Haven-bound platform, but looking towards New York City.

A modern enclosed shelter on the Grand Central-bound platform.

.. and also to New Rochelle if you want one last chance to catch an Amtrak train to Penn Station, and points south.

Standard MTA Metro-North sign in front of a handicapped ramp.

Looking southwest again, but this time at the overhead line gantries.

Bike Rack along the New Haven-bound platform.

Staircase leading down to a tunnel from the New Haven-bound platform to the New York City-bound platform.

Beneath this tunnel is a sign pointing to two staircases leading to the NYC-bound platform

The trouble is, I forgot which staircase was the westbound staircase.

.. or the eastbound staircase to the platform.

The rest of this tunnel has a pair of benches and a chain-linked fence gate.

The doorway from the tunnel to the station house, which is now a restaurant.

Old-looking station sign at the restaurant directing commuters and diners to the platform

Another sign like it within the vicinity.

The 1888-built New Haven Railroad Station House as seen from the New York City-bound platform.

Braille sign at the left doorway to the enclosed shelter.

An electrical closet, and some ticket vending machines.

View of the State Street-bound platform.

Two staircases one up to the enclosed shelter on the NYC-bound platform and the other down to the pedestrian tunnel between the New Haven-bound platform and the old station house.

Looking northeast towards State Street in New Haven again, but this time from the Grand Central-bound platform.

A Grand Central M8 is about to arrive at the station. Sorry, Metro-North, but I had to pass it up so I could take extra pictures of the next station to the northeast.

My first attempt to expand the gallery at Harrison (Metro-North station).

The west end of the platforms lead to the NY 127 bridge over the tracks.

Looking northeast towards the Grand Central Terminal-bound platform, the pedestrian bridge, and the newer station house.

Directly beneath the pedestrian bridge.

Slightly northwest view of the pedestrian bridge with a better view of the new station house, and an elevator shaft attached to it.

The covered walkway from the south parking lot to the footbridge and New Haven-bound elevator.

Distant shot of the staircases, elevator shaft and the aforementioned walkway leading to it.

The north end of the pedestrian bridge from Bruce Avenue at the intersections with Heineman Place and Sunnyside Drive.

Because the former station house is at the ends of Heineman Place and Bruce Avenue.

The old New Haven Railroad station house as seen from the pedestrian bridge

Looking northeast over the north side parking lot and the new station house.

Looking northeast towards New Haven.

.. and southwest towards New York City

There's a modern MTA information board here too, with the colors of the New Haven Line.

Sign along the NYC-bound platform as seen from the parking lot along that platform.

View of the new station house and the elevator from the north parking lot

The elevator to the pedestrian bridge from the north parking lot.

The triangle with Cross Street on Boston Post Road (US 1) in Rye.

A junction sign for NY 120. I kind of regret not taking any pics of NY 120 itself.

It's this historical marker style directional sign that got me to Rye.

Since it was nearby, I thought I'd grab an image from the Daniel E. Balls Traffic Circle.

Back through Mamaroneck, where I saw this old bank building along US 1 and Mamaroneck Avenue.

I tried to get this picture of the New Rochelle Department of Public Works in 2016, but I lost the camera that had it.

Two shots of the Clovelly Building, a series of attached local businesses on North Avenue that was once a studio for Norman Rockwell.

The Saint Gabriel's Catholic Church. More non-copyvio images of this place should be added.

Back down to Long Island, where I got a lucky shot of the Louis Koch Building.

Eastern shot of the Seaman's Avenue Bridge between Baldwin and Freeport

Looking south at Millburn Creek. This was previously known as the "Kissing Bridge."

Looking north at the creek. The old bridge was replaced.

Western shot of the bridge. I had to park in front of somebody's house nearby in Baldwin to get these.


Governor Mark R. Warner Administration Photograph Collection

This collection documents the administration of Governor Mark R. Warner (2002-2006). The photographs are a sample of the entire collection transferred to the Library of Virginia in January 2006. As part of the records of the governor's Press Office, the photographs document major accomplishments of the administration school group and organization visits to the capitol bill signings events centered on economic development, education, and transportation the governor's travels throughout the state, and myriad other topics. Understanding of events is enhanced with other Press Office records that may be viewed in the Archives & Manuscripts Reading Room at the Library of Virginia.


Art abounds at Suffolk's many museums

From outdoor sculptures to a display featuring unusual household objects of the past, you'll find something to satisfy your craving for art at Suffolk County's many museums.

1901 RESTORED RAILROAD DEPOT AND FREIGHT HOUSE, South Broadway and South Third Street, Irmisch Park, Lindenhurst, 631-957-7500, villageoflindenhurstny.gov. The Freight House has collectibles about old-time Lindenhurst. Fee Free.

AMAGANSETT HISTORICAL ASSOCIATION, Montauk Highway at Windmill Lane, Amagansett, 631-267-3020, amagansetthistory.org. Hours 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Fri.-Sun. July 2 through Sept. 6, The 1725 Miss Amelia Cottage Museum houses exhibits from Colonial times to early 20th century. The c. 1805 Phebe Edwards Mulford House houses the Kelsey Photo Archive, a collection of about 5,000 images of Amagansett people and buildings, open to the public by appointment only. Richard S. Jackson Carriage House exhibits art and is available for rent for private parties. The 1820 Lester Barn houses a collection of carriages, carts, and wagons. Fee $5, free younger than 12.

The home of the Bay Shore Historical Society dates back to 1820 and features a kitchen with a cast-iron stove, coal hot water heater and ice box. Credit: Barry Sloan

BAY SHORE HISTORICAL SOCIETY GIBSON-MACK-HOLT HOUSE, 22 Maple Ave., Bay Shore, 631-665-1707, bayshorehistoricalsociety.org. Hours 1-4 p.m. Tue. and Sat. group tours by appointment. The 1820 Victorian with 1850s furnishings features a kitchen with a cast-iron stove and coal hot water heater and ice box. Outdoors, find a chicken coop, outhouse, Victorian herb garden and grape arbor. Historical photos, baby negatives from Southside Hospital 1957-1968, Bay Shore memorabilia, and movie posters on display. Reference library available for research. Society programs at 7 p.m. the third Thur. of every month (except July and Dec.) at Bay Shore-Brightwaters Library. Fee Free.

BAYPORT AERODROME SOCIETY’S LIVING AVIATION MUSEUM, 60 Vitamin Drive, off Church Street, Bayport, bayportaerodromesociety.org. Hours 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Sun. April-Nov., or by appointment. A 24-hangar complex with antique and experimental aircraft two hangars with exhibits on aviation history. Fee Free.

THE BIG DUCK, 1012 Flanders Rd. (Route 24), Flanders, 631-852-3377, bigduck.org. Hours 10 a.m.-5 p.m. daily, but call ahead. Built in 1931, the Big Duck was where the Martin and Jeule Maurer family sold their Peking ducks on Riverhead’s West Main Street. In 1936, the Maurers moved the building to Route 24 in Flanders. Roadside architecture that represents the goods sold in the building is now known as "duck architecture." Duck-farming exhibit in the adjacent Victorian Barn weekends during summer. Fee Free.

BRIDGEHAMPTON MUSEUM, 2368 Montauk Hwy. and Corwith Avenue, Bridgehampton, 631-537-1088 archives: bhmuseum.org, 631-613-6730. Hours By appointment only until COVID restrictions are lifted then hours will resume to 10 a.m.-3 p.m. Mon.-Fri. all-year, plus 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Sat. June-Oct. and by appointment. Corwith House (1800s) features rotating exhibits. Reserve to see 1870s wheelwright-blacksmith shop and 1907 jailhouse. Fee $5.

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BROOKHAVEN TOWN VOLUNTEER FIREFIGHTERS MUSEUM, Fireman’s Memorial Park, Route 25 (Middle Country Road), Ridge, 631-924-8114, brookhavenfiremuseum.org. Hours Tours by appointment. Restored 1889 Center Moriches firehouse with memorabilia and 10 pieces of equipment. A second house has nine trucks. Fee Donations.

Have a ball playing miniature golf at the Children's Museum of the East End in Bridgehampton. Credit: Newsday/J. Conrad Williams Jr.

CHILDREN’S MUSEUM OF THE EAST END, 376 Bridgehampton-Sag Harbor Tpke., Bridgehampton, 631-537-8250, cmee.org. Hours Sessions 9:30-11:30 a.m., noon-2 p.m. and 2:30-4:30 p.m. daily, closed Thursdays, reservations required online. Learn about wind science to firefighting, farming to fishing family concerts. Fee $19, free younger than 12 months.

COLD SPRING HARBOR LABORATORY DNA LEARNING CENTER, 334 Main St., Cold Spring Harbor, 516-367-5170, dnalc.org. Hours 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Mon.-Fri. A free, self-guided exhibit offers insight into the study of DNA and human origins, reservations required. Check the website for science programs, guided Ötzi the Iceman tours, and summer science camps. Fee Varies.

CORWITH WINDMILL, VILLAGE GREEN, 695 Montauk Hwy., Water Mill, 631-283-0527. Hours Tours of the mill, once used for grinding grain, by appointment. Built in Sag Harbor in 1800, moved in 1813, operated until 1887. Fee Donations.

CUSTER INSTITUTE AND OBSERVATORY, 1115 Main Bayview Rd., off Route 25, Southold, 631-765-2626, custerobservatory.org. Hours 7 p.m.-midnight Sat. call ahead for group tours. High-powered telescopes, portable planetarium shows, lectures, classes, concerts and art exhibits. Fee Suggested donation $5, $3 younger than 14.

CUSTOM HOUSE, Main and Garden Streets, Sag Harbor, preservationlongisland.org/custom-house, 631-692-4664. Hours Due to COVID, check website or call. The 18th century home of the port's first customs master, Henry Packer Dering. Period rooms and furnishings including formal dining room, custom master’s office, children’s rooms, kitchen, pantry and laundry. Fee $6, $5 seniors, $3 ages 7-14.

CUTCHOGUE VILLAGE GREEN HISTORIC BUILDINGS, 27320 Rte. 25 (Main Road), Cutchogue, cutchoguenewsuffolkhistory.org 631-734-7122. Hours Due to COVID, check website or call. The Old House, from the 17th century, is one of the state's most significant English-style frame homes. Furnishings reflect the lifestyle of a prominent founding family. Nearby, the pre-Revolutionary Wickham Farmhouse features household artifacts of the 18th and 19th centuries. An 1840 one-room Old Schoolhouse displays Native American relics from local collections. The Village Garage exhibits the "Evolution of Transportation," including a 1926 Model T Ford truck. The Old Red Barn houses a collection of 19th century farm and woodworking tools. A pre-Civil War Carriage House serves as a gift shop and information center. Fee Donation.

EAST END SEAPORT MUSEUM, Third Street at Ferry Dock, Greenport, eastendseaport.org. Hours Opening Memorial Day, hours vary due to COVID, check website. 750-gallon saltwater aquarium two Fresnel lenses gift shop exhibits. Weekly lighthouse cruises, weekday fishing trips and tours May-Oct. Reservations recommended. Events: Land & Sea Gala Sept. 17 Annual East End Maritime Festival Sept. 18-19. Fee Free.

EAST HAMPTON HISTORICAL SOCIETY, 151 Main St., East Hampton, easthamptonhistory.org, 631-324-6850. Hours Clinton Academy Museum, Visitor Center/Gift Shop, open 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Mon.-Fri. check website for weekend hours. The historical society is the parent organization of 7 museums, national landmark, historic sites. The Mulford Farm Museum, 10 James Lane, available for tours with advance reservations (fee), is considered one of America’s most significant, intact English Colonial farmsteads. Clinton Academy Museum, 151 Main St., preserves the architecture of the state’s first chartered secondary school (circa 1784) and offers revolving fine art exhibits as well as decorative and folk arts from the society’s collections. Town House Museum, 149 Main St., is an early town government meeting place once used as a school. The Hook Schoolhouse, 149 Main St., a one-room, 18th century schoolhouse. The Osborn-Jackson House Museum, 101 Main St., circa 1720, is the society’s headquarters and is closed for renovations. East Hampton Town Marine Museum, 301 Bluff Rd., Amagansett, open July 1-Sept. 30, 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Thurs.-Sun. The Claus Hoie Gallery of Whaling, depicts a 19th century Sag Harbor voyage as described in a whaling log. The Thomas & Mary Nimmo Moran Studio, open July 1-Sept. 30, 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Fri.-Sun., advance tickets required. An 1884 studio cottage, marked the beginning of the village as an artist’s colony. Fee Varies.

EASTVILLE HERITAGE HOUSE, 139 Hampton St., Sag Harbor, eastvillehistorical.org, 631-725-4711. Hours Call for appointment. One-story, restored Sears-Roebuck mail-order house with letters, journals, photos, furniture and artifacts dating from the 1800s. The house was purchased through a catalog in 1925 by Lippman Johnson, an African-American entrepreneur, and his wife, Rose. Tours available of the home, St. David AME Zion Cemetery and surrounding community. Fee $10, $5 children.

GREATER PATCHOGUE HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM, 160 W. Main Street, Patchogue, 631-654-1712, greaterpatchoguehistoricalsociety.com. Hours Noon-3 p.m. Fri.-Sat. Housed at the lower level of Patchogue’s Carnegie Library, the museum features historical artifacts, displays, and photographs pertaining to the history of the greater Patchogue area. Fee Free.

GUILD HALL MUSEUM 158 Main St., East Hampton, 631-324-0806, guildhall.org. Hours Call for hours. East Hampton's cultural center for arts and entertainment. Alexis Rockman: Shipwrecks Exhibition June 12-July 26 Clothesline Art Sale July 24 Robert Longo: A House Divided Exhibition Aug. 7-Oct. 17. Golf Outing Sept. 20, Maidstone Club. Fee Free.

HALLOCKVILLE MUSEUM FARM, 6038 Sound Ave., Riverhead, 631-298-5292, hallockville.org. Hours Vary. This 28-acre historic farm site represents rural life on the North Fork from the 1760s to 1930s and is surrounded by more than 500 acres of preserved land. Annual Hallockville Barn Dance July 31. Country Fair and Craft Show Aug. 28. Fee Varies.

HECKSCHER MUSEUM OF ART, 2 Prime Ave. at Route 25A, Huntington, 631-380-3230, heckscher.org. Hours Noon-5 p.m. Thurs.-Sun. Visit website for updates on all programs. Exhibitions "The Heckscher Museum Celebrates 100" June 5-Jan. 9 Events Art in Bloom, June 12-13 DRAW OUT! Free Community Arts Festival, Sept 26, rain date: Oct 3. Fee $5. free younger than 10.

HOME SWEET HOME, 14 James Lane, East Hampton, 631-324-0713, homesweethomemuseum.org. Hours May 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Sat., 1-4 p.m. Sun., June-Aug. 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Mon.-Sat., 1-4 p.m. Sun. weekends only Oct.-Nov. This 18th century saltbox house contains artifacts relating to the life of John Howard Payne, who wrote the lyrics to the song "Home Sweet Home." It displays antique furniture, Lusterware and other ceramics. Guided tours available. Pantigo Windmill (1804) and historical gardens on property. Fee $4, $2 ages 12 and younger.

HUNTINGTON HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUMS, 209 Main St., Huntington, 631-427-7045, huntingtonhistoricalsociety.org. Hours Check website or call. Conklin Farm House Museum, circa 1750, 2 High St. (at New York Avenue). Period rooms with 18th and 19th century furnishings, table and chair used by George Washington during his 1790 Long Island tour. The 1795 Kissam House Museum, 434 Park Ave., is noted for Egyptian Revival woodwork. Antiques & Collectibles Shop is on the Kissam grounds. 1892 Soldiers and Sailors Memorial Building houses the History and Decorative Arts Museum, 228 Main St. Fee Sewing and Trade School, $5 Kissam House, $5 Conklin House, $5, $3 seniors and students. Soldiers and Sailors Memorial Building, free.

ISLIP ART MUSEUM, 50 Irish Lane, East Islip, 631-224-5402, islipartmuseum.org or 631-224-5420. Hours Noon-4 p.m. Thur.-Sat., closed Sun.-Mon. Housed in historic Brookwood Hall, the museum specializes in avant-garde art, with about five exhibits a year, plus a permanent collection. Virtual Exhibits "Forever Young" July-Sept., "Seeing For Ourselves" Sept.-Nov., "2-Together" Oct.-Dec. Fee Suggested: $5.

JOHN SCUDDER AND MARY PELLETREAU HAVENS HOMESTEAD, 15 E. Main St., Center Moriches, 631-461-6271, havenshomestead.org. Hours Museum shop 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Sat.-Sun., Tours of house museum by appointment. Moriches Bay Historical Society maintains John Scudder Havens Homestead (circa 1755) Dutch Colonial with circa-1898 addition and circa-1920 Emery Tuttle duck farm barn. Visit 260-acre Terrell River County Park Preserve, Havens Estate, across the street. Event Antique Show, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. May 29, Free. Antique Car Show, 11 a.m.-4 p.m. June 26, $5.

JOSEPH LLOYD MANOR, 1 Lloyd Lane and Lloyd Harbor Road, preservationlongisland.org, 631-692-4664. Hours Check website or call. Completed in 1767, the manor overlooks Lloyd Harbor. Jupiter Hammon, one of the first published African-American authors, lived, wrote and was enslaved here. Fee $5, $3 ages 7-14 and seniors.

KETCHAM INN, 81 Main St., Center Moriches, 631-878-1855, ketchaminnfoundation.org. Hours Tours of Inn by appointment, book barn open 1-5 p.m. Mon., Thur.-Fri. and 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Sat.-Sun. Also, a circa-1898 teepee associated with Unkechaug Indians Ketcham Farm Book Barn, a restored timber-frame barn accepts antique, rare and like-new books for resale to support restoration. Mary E. Bell House, 61 Railroad Ave., is known as the "slave house," tours by appointment. Events Stirring up History "Pop Inns," 11 a.m.-noon May 30, June 13, July 11, Aug. 15, Stop by the hearth kitchen at the Ketcham Inn, see and taste what is cooking on the hearth while learning a bit of history, $10. Fee Tour $18.

LAKE RONKONKOMA HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM, 328 Hawkins Ave., Lake Ronkonkoma, 631-467-3152, lakerhs.org. Hours 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Sat. and by appointment. The Ronkonkoma Library building opened in 1916 and now houses the museum, with more than 1,000 arrowheads, Indian weapons and tools. Memorabilia of Broadway actress Maude Adams is on display. The society also maintains the Fitz-Greene Hallock Homestead Museum, circa 1888, with 14 rooms, including 11 bedrooms tours by appointment. Fee Free.

LAUDER MUSEUM, 170 Broadway, Amityville, 631-598-1486, Hours 2-4 p.m. Sun., Tue., Fri., research library, tours by appointment. Exhibits feature an 1880s Victorian parlor, kitchens, the impact of Great South Bay, decoys, early photos and models of local buildings. A diorama of Frank Buck’s Zoo, which operated in Massapequa from the 1930s to 1960s, is on permanent display. Fee Free.

LEIBER COLLECTION MUSEUM, 446 Old Stone Hwy., East Hampton, 631-329-3288, leibermuseum.org. Hours 1-4 p.m. Sat.-Sun. and Wed. with reservations online. Gallery and museum feature more than 500 Judith Leiber handbags and paintings by Gerson Leiber. Fee Free.

LEO P. OSTEBO KINGS PARK HERITAGE MUSEUM, 99 Old Dock Rd., in the RJO building. Weekend, event and summer entrance 101 Church St., Kings Park, 631-269-3305, kpheritagemuseum.net. Hours 10:30 a.m.-3 p.m. Sat. Tours by appointment. Ten rooms filled with artifacts, including historic photos of local families and the town (1800s-today) collections include Ford Model A and Model T, 1931 Plymouth, 1955 Plymouth autos, local and military artifacts. Fee Free.

LONG ISLAND AQUARIUM, 431 E. Main St., Riverhead, 631-208-9200, longislandaquarium.com. Hours 10 a.m.-5 p.m. daily except Thanksgiving, Christmas. Features a wide range of exhibits that bring undersea wonders to life. The more than 100 exhibits include the legendary Lost City of Atlantis, living coral and the ecosystem along the Peconic River. Fee $39.99 ages 13-61, $29.99 ages 62 and older, $27.99 ages 3-12.

LONG ISLAND EXPLORIUM, 101 E. Broadway, Port Jefferson, 631-331-3277, longislandexplorium.org. Hours Check website. Visitors discover the wonders of STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math). Offers hands-on exhibits and programs for children and families, weekly STEM challenges, Maker Spotlight programs, summer camps and birthday parties. Fee $5, free younger than 1.

LONG ISLAND MARITIME MUSEUM, 88 West Ave., West Sayville, 631-854-4974, limaritime.org. Hours 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Mon.-Tue. and Thur.-Sat., noon- 4 p.m. Sun., closed Wed. Focus is on Long Island’s maritime history. Exhibits include historic wooden boats, sailboats, an oyster culling house and bayman's cottage. Museum is home to the oyster sloop Priscilla. Seafood Festival Aug. 21-22. Fee $8, $6 seniors and children group tours available.

Step back to the days when horse power was the mode of transportation at the Carriage House at the Long Island Museum in Stony Brook. Credit: Daniel Brennan

LONGWOOD ESTATE, Longwood and Smith roads, Ridge, 631-924-1820, brookhavenny.gov. Hours Closed due to COVID, call for hours. A Town of Brookhaven historic park, circa 1790, 35 acres, manor house, one-room school house and barns. call for educational programs. Fee Free, fee for some activities.

LYZON HAT SHOP MUSEUM, 116 W. Montauk Hwy., Hampton Bays, 631-728-0887, hbhps.org. Hours By appointment and will resume Saturdays when guidelines allow. Exhibits feature about 70 original handmade hats Walter King fashioned for socialites from near and far until the shop closed. Also included are some of the original decorative Lyzon hat boxes, a wood form King used to make hats and some of the original brand labels. "Playing Hooky," a sport fishing exhibit. Fee Donation.

MANORVILLE HISTORICAL SOCIETY, 50 North St., Manorville, 631-878-8358, mhsmuseum.org. Hours Thrift store and schoolhouse open 10:30 a.m.-3 p.m. Wed., the first Sat. of each month and by appointment. 1929 two-room schoolhouse is furnished with period artifacts. Fee Free.

MATHER HOUSE MUSEUM, 115 Prospect St., Port Jefferson, 631-473-2665, portjeffhistorical.org. Hours Check website. Until World War I, Port Jefferson was a major shipbuilding center and John T. Mather a notable shipbuilder. The marine barn and tool shed display ship artifacts, and the Collins Carriage House features two 19th century carriages. There’s also a country store, barber and butcher shops, clock museum, post office and consignment shop. Event: Annual Country Auction, 9 a.m. Oct. 16.

MATTITUCK-LAUREL HISTORICAL SOCIETY AND MUSEUMS, Main Road and Cardinal Drive, Mattituck, 631-298-5248, mlhistoricalsociety.org. Hours 1-4 p.m. Sat.-Sun. July-Sept. and by appointment. Two houses (1799 and 1840), milk house (circa 1850) and outbuilding with 19th century farm implements and machines and a 1790 one-room schoolhouse. Exhibits of Indian artifacts, quilts, 19th century women’s clothing. Free programs in the schoolhouse (2 p.m. Sun.) Fee Donations.

MEADOW CROFT, 299 Middle Rd., Sayville, 631-472-4625, bayportbluepointheritage.org. Hours Tours at 2 p.m. Sat.-Sun. June-Oct. Grounds open year-round. The 1891 home of John Ellis Roosevelt, cousin and legal adviser to President Theodore Roosevelt. Fee Donations.

MILLER PLACE-MOUNT SINAI HISTORICAL SOCIETY, 1720 WILLIAM MILLER HOUSE, 75 N. Country Rd., Miller Place, mpmshistoricalsociety.org, 631-476-5742. Hours Guided tours by appointment only. House includes two half-houses attached to the original structure. Also corn cribs, courthouse, barn and Old Samuel Miller Post Office. Self-guided pocket size booklets of the historic district. Fee Donation, fee for some programs.

NORTHPORT HISTORICAL SOCIETY, 215 Main St., Northport, 631-757-9859, northporthistorical.org. Hours 1-4:30 p.m. Wed.-Sun. Housed in a former Carnegie library, rotating exhibits explore the history and culture of the surrounding area. Museum shop on site. Fee $5 suggested donation.

OYSTERPONDS HISTORICAL SOCIETY, 1555 Village Lane, Orient, oysterpondshistoricalsociety.org, 631-323-2480. Hours 2-5 p.m. Fri. and Sun., 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Sat. Exhibits draw on a collection of manuscripts, art and historical objects illustrating stories of Orient and East Marion. Village House and Webb House, restored to illustrate life in a 19th century boardinghouse and 18th century tavern in Oysterponds. Fee $10 donation.

PARRISH ART MUSEUM, 279 Montauk Hwy., Water Mill, 631-283-2118, parrishart.org. Hours 11 a.m.-12:30 p.m., 1-2:30 p.m., 3-4:30 p.m. Fri.-mon., reservations required. World-class permanent collection plus special exhibitions and public programs. Walking tours featuring outdoor sculpture are available by appointment. Fee $12, $9 seniors, free younger than 18 and students with ID.

POLLOCK-KRASNER HOUSE AND STUDY CENTER, 830 Springs-Fireplace Rd., East Hampton, 631-324- 4929, pkhouse.org. Hours Thur.-Sun. May-Oct.: one-hour guided tours by advance reservation. Thur., Fri. & Sat. tours at noon, 2 and 4 p.m. Sun. tours at noon and 2 p.m. (Reserve on the website). The former home and studio of Abstract Expressionist painters Jackson Pollock and Lee Krasner. Summer lectures, fall film series, art reference library. Exhibitions: "Mary Abbott: The Living Possibility of Paint," May 1-July. 25 "Picasso in Pollock," Jul. 29-Oct. 31. Fee $15, $10 younger than 12, infants free. Virtual reality studio tours $10, available only as a package with guided tours.

RAILROAD MUSEUM OF LONG ISLAND (GREENPORT), 440 Fourth St., at the tracks, Greenport, 631-477-0439, rmli.org. Hours 11 a.m.-4 p.m. Sat.-Sun. May 29-mid-Oct. In a historic 1892 LIRR freight station with photos, displays, uniforms, operating control tower and a railroad model of Greenport outside is the 1907 snowplow "Jaws," a 1960 boxcar and a 1925 wooden caboose. Model train layout, gift shop. Limited handicapped access on rail cars. Fee $8, $4 ages 5-12.

RAILROAD MUSEUM OF LONG ISLAND (RIVERHEAD), 416 Griffing Ave., Riverhead, 631-727-7920, rmli.org. Hours 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Sat.-Sun. through mid-October. Call for programs. Retired railroad equipment on display outside: 3 steam locomotives, 2 LIRR diesel locomotives, the first LIRR all-aluminum double-decker passenger car and more. Ride the 1964-65 World's Fair mini train. Limited handicapped access on rail cars. Indoor museum with photos, railroad memorabilia, gift shop, and the Historic Lionel Layout. Fee $12, $6 ages 5-12.

SAG HARBOR HISTORICAL SOCIETY, Annie Cooper Boyd House, 174 Main St., Sag Harbor, 631-725-5092, sagharborhistorical.org. Hours 1-4 p.m. Sat.-Sun. and holidays Memorial Day-Columbus Day other times by appointment. Research library hours by appointment. The 1700s house has paintings by Annie Cooper Boyd. Fee Donations.

SAG HARBOR WHALING MUSEUM, 200 Main St., Sag Harbor, sagtikosmanor.org. The manor’s history dates back to 1692. British forces occupied it briefly during the Revolutionary War. President Washington stayed there in 1790. Due to COVID-19 the manor house and its tours have been temporarily closed with the exception of some garden/plant sales offerings. On the grounds, view the carriage house, buttery, walled garden and family cemetery.

SAYVILLE HISTORICAL SOCIETY, Edwards Street and Collins Avenue, Sayville, 631-563-0186. Hours Tours by appointment. The society maintains the 1785 Edwards' Homestead, furnished with articles owned by the family that lived there through the 1940s. They were farmers and merchants who shipped firewood and coal up and down the East Coast. Another building exhibits items from Sayville and West Sayville history. Fee Donations.

SHELTER ISLAND HISTORY CENTER, 16 S. Ferry Rd. (Route 114), Shelter Island, shelterislandhistorical.org, 631-749-0025. Hours 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Wed.-Sat. year-round. Havens House was built in 1743 by William Havens and lived in by his son Captain James Havens one of eight Suffolk men elected to the Provincial Congress. The Pederson Family History Center opened in 2019, includes exhibit space and archival research department. Events: Farmers Market 9 a.m.-12:30 p.m., Sat. May 23-Labor Day. Garden Tours, May 29 and July 10, register for both online, Musical Play "A Hill of Beans" July 24-25 and ongoing exhibits. Fee Donation.

SHERWOOD-JAYNE FARM, 55 Old Post Rd., East Setauket preservationlongisland.org/sherwood-jayne-farm, 631-692-4664. Hours Call or check website. The18th century farmstead features a barn, sheep, pastures and walking trails. The house has eighteenth century hand-painted floral wall decorations and period furnishings. Fee $5, $3 ages 7-14 and seniors.

SMITHTOWN HISTORICAL SOCIETY, 239 Middle Country Rd., Smithtown, 631-265-6768, smithtownhistorical.org. Hours Office open 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Mon.-Fri. Historic buildings on the main campus include the Old Library (circa 1890), Epenetus Smith Tavern (circa 1740), Franklin O. Arthur Farm (circa 1800), and Judge J. Lawrence Smith Homestead (circa 1750). The Obadiah Smith House (circa 1700) is situated on St. Johnland Road in Kings Park, and the Caleb Smith II House (circa 1819), 5 North Country Rd., Smithtown is the site of a museum exhibit and available to view by appointment. All buildings are open to the public for special events or registered group tours. The Frank Brush Barn (circa 1900) is a site of lectures, concerts, dances and more, and is available as a party rental space. Roseneath Cottage (circa 1918) is the Historical Society headquarters. Summer camp programs, ages 6-12, 9:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m., July-Aug. Fee Varies.

SOUTHAMPTON HISTORY MUSEUM/ROGERS MANSION MUSEUM COMPLEX, 17 Meeting House Lane, Southampton, southamptonhistory.org, 631-283-2494. Hours 11 a.m.-4 p.m. Wed.-Sat. March-Dec. by appointment only. Developed during Southampton’s Gilded Age, the 20-room mansion has period rooms with furnishings reflecting the summer home of philanthropist Samuel L. Parrish, 1900 to 1930. On the museum grounds are buildings typical of a 19th century village, including the 1825 Sayre Barn, an 1830 schoolhouse plus blacksmith and carpenter shops. Pelletreau Silver Shop, 80 Main St., Southampton, 11 a.m.-4 p.m. Tue.-Sat., built in 1686 with a jeweler on the premises, making jewelry and explaining the shop's history, (free). The Thomas Halsey Homestead, 249 S. Main St., Southampton, 11 a.m.-4 p.m. Sat. July-Sept. or by appointment, is the oldest English-style house in New York State with five period rooms that reflect a Southampton pioneering family circa 1700, an herbal garden and flower beds open to the public in season. Fee $5, free 17 and younger.

SOUTH FORK NATURAL HISTORY MUSEUM AND NATURE CENTER, 377 Bridgehampton/Sag Harbor Tpke., Bridgehampton, 631-537-9735, sofo.org. Hours 10-11:30 a.m. and 1-2:30 p.m. advance reservation needed. Hands-on nature experiences in both the museum and outdoors. Marine touch tank for children and a panoramic deck with a view of preserved acres of fields and woodlands. After visiting the museum, take a walk on the Vineyard Nature Trail, part of the Long Pond Greenbelt. Fee $10, $7 ages 3-12.

SOUTHOLD HISTORICAL MUSEUM, 55200 Rte. 25 (Main Road and Maple Lane), 631-765-5500, southoldhistorical.org. Hours 1-4 p.m. Sat.-Sun., July 3-Sept. 12. Wed. by appointment. The Museum Complex features houses, barns and outbuildings from 1750 to 1900s. The complex comprises the Ann Currie-Bell House, with period rooms and a changing exhibition gallery the revolutionary Thomas Moore House, which houses an exhibition about enslaved people a carriage house and a blacksmith shop and more. The Nautical Museum at Horton Point Lighthouse, 3575 Lighthouse Rd. in Southold, features maritime artifacts, 12-3 p.m. Sat.-Sun. July 3 -Sept. 12. The Prince Building, 54325 Main Rd., houses Treasure Exchange Shop and the Museum Gift Shop, call for hours. Fee $5, $10 for families includes all locations $5 parking fee at Horton Point Lighthouse.

SOUTHOLD INDIAN MUSEUM, 1080 Main Bayview Rd., Southold, southoldindianmuseum.org, 631-765-5577. Hours 1:30-4:30 p.m. Sun. and by appointment. Collection of artifacts from earliest Long Island inhabitants 10,000 years ago to present day. Included is the handiwork of Eskimos, middle and Far Western Indians and native tribes of Central and South America. Group educational programs available (fee) all ages, call. Exhibit: Digital Archiving of Museum Artifacts. Fee Donation.

STIRLING HISTORICAL SOCIETY, MARGARET E. IRELAND HOUSE MUSEUM, 319 Main St., Greenport, 631-456-9044, greenportvillage.com. Hours 1-4 p.m. weekends July-Sept. and by appointment. The circa-1830s home is furnished with 19th and 20th century equipment and memorabilia. Other items include artifacts and tools from the Greenport whaling and oyster industries. Fee Free.

STONY BROOK GRIST MILL, Harbor Road, off Main Street, Stony Brook, 631-751-2244, wmho.org. Hours 1-4:30 p.m. Sun. June-Oct. L.I.'s most completely equipped working mill, dating to 1751, is a Revolutionary War Heritage Trail site. It features a grain milling demonstration and country store. Fee $2, $1 younger than 12.

Richard Doctorow, curator of the "What the Heck Is That?" exhibit at the Suffolk County Historical Society Museum in Riverhead, shows one of the offbeat items on display. Credit: Randee Daddona


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